New Recipe of the Month – Homemade Banana Bread

MS Conversations Recipe of the MonthDo you often think about trying a new recipe or like to watch the cooking channels?  MSAA is proud to announce the New Recipe of the Month!  Each month a new recipe will be shared with you to try and enjoy.

The first recipe I would like to share with you is my homemade Banana Bread.  I like simple-to-follow recipes, and this is definitely one of them. It takes about 10 minutes to prepare and one hour to bake.

Ingredients: 

½ cup vegetable oil
1 cup sugar
2 eggs, beaten
3 medium extra ripe bananas, finely mashed
2 cups wheat flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon baking powder
½ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla
3 tablespoons milk
Chocolate chips or nuts optional.  Hand mix into batter

Directions:

  1. Cream together eggs, vegetable oil and sugar.
  2. Add mashed bananas.
  3. Combine well.
  4. Sift together wheat flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Add to creamed mixture.
  5. Add vanilla and milk.
  6. You can also add chocolate chips or nuts if you would like.
  7. Pour into greased and floured loaf pan.
  8. Bake at 350 degrees for 1 hour.

Happy Baking!

 

*We hope you enjoy our Recipe of the Month selections on MS Conversations. Just remember: these entries may not necessarily be a part of an MS-specific diet; these are simply recipes compiled from MSAA staff either from their own family recipe collection or based on recipes we think you might enjoy. As always, make sure to consult your doctor about any food or nutrition questions as they relate to your MS.

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MS Symptom Changes

In keeping with the theme of ‘change’ during this month’s MS Conversations, I wanted to talk about MS symptoms and how they can differ for those diagnosed. MS often comes with its’ own agenda and unpredictable course for those affected, often making it difficult to anticipate what symptoms can arise and how they can vary from day to day. And because each person’s experience differs greatly with MS, it’s challenging to try and compare situations in order to come up with guide points and specifics to learn from throughout the disease. The type of symptoms, their range of severity, and their disappearing/reappearing act can all change according to how one’s MS affects them, which further adds to the list of unattractive traits held by MS.

However, because people with MS have a great voice and have been consistent with reporting their symptoms and experiences with the disease, doctors and researchers have an abundance of information to work with for developing more symptom management therapies and treatments that could potentially help reduce these issues. There are several techniques used to treat MS symptoms, but it may take some trial and error along with continued follow-up with a doctor to find what works best and most effectively. While no two MS cases look exactly alike, each individual’s condition brings with it more power and knowledge because it’s so unique, and therefore helps to contribute to the understanding of this ever-changing landscape.

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Introducing My MSAA Community for People Affected by Multiple Sclerosis

My MSAA Community (1)MSAA is excited to announce that, in partnership with HealthUnlocked, we have launched a new peer-to-peer online community called My MSAA Community! This free online forum is a safe place for anyone who has been affected by MS, whether they have been diagnosed or are a care partner, to share their stories and find information and support.

Sometimes when you are going through something personal and you try to share your feelings or your experience with someone who hasn’t been through the same thing, you can find yourself hitting an emotional wall.  The person you share your feelings with may be able to empathize and understand what you are sharing to a certain extent, but they may not fully appreciate what you are going through, since they haven’t experienced it themselves.  In these situations you can feel like you need to talk to someone who “gets it” and has been through what you are going through.

My MSAA Community is designed as an online community and forum for people whose lives have been affected by multiple sclerosis to find each other and share their experiences as a way of providing support and information.  This community allows members to post questions and get answers from others on the forum and contribute to other ongoing conversations.

Follow or join the community at: https://healthunlocked.com/mymsaa

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What is Your Perspective?

On our helpline here at MSAA we speak with clients every day from across the country who contact us for any number of things. Resources for assistance, information on our programs, clarification on something they saw or read on our site or in our publications and at times they’re looking for someone to speak to who they can bounce ideas off of or just have a listening ear. Recently I spoke with a client who was more newly diagnosed and called to get some broad spectrum information. What struck me at the end of our call was that the client taught me probably more than I did them.

During our conversation we happened upon the idea of changes in perspective. They recounted to me how their world had very much changed when they were diagnosed with MS, in the not too distant past, and how at first they were not sure at all what to do. There were lots of questions, some of which were unfortunately met with little, or vague answers. New terminology to learn. Medicine to juggle. Periods of anger, frustration, and sadness. New planning to do they hadn’t thought of before. I listened as they recounted one such day that found them sitting on the bedroom floor in the dark not sure of what to do next. Unaware of the time that was passing, just sitting. “This,” they told me, “was my finding perspective. I sat on the floor recounting stories to myself of events in my life, and in the middle of my thoughts I found a new way to see things.” After a good deal of time angry and upset on their bedroom floor they sat and recounted all the events that made them proud, excited, and happy. The client didn’t want those events to be the only memories with a happy connotation that they would ever have. All in the past.

The client said they pulled out some scrap paper and made lists of the things they were angry and frustrated over.  Things that they felt they had lost or missed. Along with that, they scribed a list of the things they enjoyed, they wanted to do, they were good at or had interest in. This list, they said, was there perspective. This list was longer and when they read it over they found in it thoughts of how to still visit all the European countries on their bucket list, while dealing with the uncomfortable temperatures. How to volunteer and be part of their community while working in different time increments or events. There they thought of how best to use their love of blogs, working with people and photography to connect with others and raise awareness.

They said they had two ways to go about this and the one they were deciding on was to choose their attitude not to let their attitude be chosen for them. They looked at the list of things they were angry over and decided to choose their attitude toward it. Would it always be easy to change the way they thought about being diagnosed?  No. But if they chose to change their perspective, not from the things they had lost, but toward the things they had and could do, and use and focus on those…it gave them a different perspective. “That,” they told me, “got me off the floor onto my bed.” Then a little while longer to their dining room table where they started to brainstorm, make some new plans and objectives keeping their MS in mind, but not letting their MS choose the plans. Perspective is just what you make it and sometimes that’s easier said than done. But we all have a choice to make in changing the way we look at things. What is your perspective?perspective

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Who Likes Change?

So honestly I’ve never been one to ever really like change. Even when I was younger I don’t think I was as resilient as other kids around me when it came to change because I always seemed to struggle with it. Even as I continue into adulthood change can still create feelings of anxiety, confusion and discomfort at times. And this can occur with good change too; I think it’s the concept of something being different than it was before that I have trouble accepting, especially when it’s a change that I have no say over. Now don’t get me wrong, certain types of changes can be good, when they produce positive and beneficial differences in life and particular circumstances. But in general I think we struggle with change because it has great influence over our control and expectations. It’s difficult to like change if it’s something you didn’t ask for or that was necessarily warranted, especially if its arrival produces unwelcome challenges. So what do you do when change comes along?

Everyone’s coping mechanisms are different when it comes to dealing with change. Some individuals try to meet change head-on and seek out ways to adjust and adapt, while others try to fight change and work hard to deny it and refuse acceptance of it. Some look to others for support during times of change, whereas other individuals prefer to be alone to cope with it. What’s important to know is that everyone has experienced some form of change in their lives, and while none of the changes may look exactly the same, the ways in which people try to cope with it can look very similar. There are no absolutes when it comes to facing change—no specific right or wrong way to work it out. But you have more control than you think in these situations; you’re the one who gets to decide how you want to approach change in those moments and how much influence it can truly have.

How do you cope with change?

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Annual AAN and CMSC Meeting Highlights

Every year, the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and the Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers (CMSC) hold meetings to present on topics of interest to the multiple sclerosis community.  This year, the annual AAN meeting was held in Vancouver, Canada in April and the CMSC meeting took place in Maryland at the beginning of June.

After each meeting, MSAA condenses all of the information presented at these meetings, which is meant for medical professionals, to easy-to-read articles to keep you informed about what is new in the world of multiple sclerosis.

Both meetings this year covered a range of topics, but here are a few items highlighted in MSAA’s annual review of these meetings:

  • Updates on a sampling of approved and experimental treatments
  • Trial results for new symptom-management treatments and programs
  • Interesting studies on pediatric MS, risk of MS, and children of parents with MS
  • Various other topics, such as gut immunity, the effects of poor sleep, and gaps in public awareness about MS

Read the full article on MSAA’s Latest News section to see more topics presented at this year’s meetings!

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(Last Minute) Summer Fun

As we continue to pass through the summer months and find ourselves looking towards a change of season (hopefully soon!), there’s still some time for fun to be had during the remainder of the summer. At times it can be difficult to try to make plans or schedule activities if the uninvited MS decides to rear its head and join in. But there are some last minute ways to try and enjoy the rest of the season, without having to make elaborate plans that MS will try to outdo.

There are times when heat-excessive summer days call for indoor activities, so why not have a game day/night? Getting back to a time where playing board games and cards was all the rage can be fun and nostalgic, and a good way to find some last minute amusement with friends or family. And keeping with the indoor theme, how about a movie night? Gathering together to watch a good flick, even if coordinated last minute, can be relaxing and entertaining. Orchestrating a last minute trip to the movies or visiting a museum or aquarium can also be some fun activities that may not require excessive planning but an opportunity to enjoy events of the season.

Check with community offices and message boards in your area to find some local events being held during the rest of the summer. Concerts, festivals, shows and exhibitions are just some of the local activities your community may offer that you can take advantage of last minute. Sometimes trying to take part in an activity that’s more spur of the moment and last minute can work to your benefit, especially if it catches MS off guard and doesn’t give it the opportunity to invite itself!

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Getting Back to Nature

Did you know that across our country there are amazing State Parks you can visit and enjoy?  What a great way to explore new parts of the country or even a local state park in your own back yard.

NPS-Centennial-ImageNow that summer is here, hopefully you have a little extra free time.  A great way to use that free time is to get out and enjoy nature.  Whether sitting in your backyard or going to a local park, taking in the sights, sounds, and smells of nature can be very relaxing and  therapeutic.

State Parks are also a great place to become one with nature.  While they might be a little further away, they are well worth the trip.

The state park entrance pass system works differently in each state. Many states offer some sort of pass that allows for unlimited entry at most state parks, while others offer park passes on a park-by-park basis. A few states do not charge entry fees to their state parks at all if you are a resident of that state.  Most states even offer a Disability Discount Pass for people who have documented disabilities.   All fifty states are listed below, with a link to their official state park website and information on their state park entrance pass program. Find your state, order an entrance pass, and enjoy unlimited access to the natural beauty your state has to offer!

 

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Summer Love

By Lauren Kovacs

Summer is a double edged sword for many with MS.  Making the monster happy is a battle.  While winning the war may not come until a cure, small victories can be celebrated.

Heat is a battle most of us fight.   Staying cool is essential.  Cooling vests with the ice packs work well.  I don’t enjoy looking like someone on safari suffering from some weird allergic reaction, but it is better than the alternative.  Lumpy ice packs stuffed into a vest are not a fashion statement anyone wants to make.

Stick to a routine, as much as possible.  I know having kids home for the summer is like herding drunken cats.  As a mother of three boys and being a frequent wheelchair user, I am very familiar with the struggle.  Pick an activity indoors, like bowling.  It is cheap and you can bask in the A/C with caffeine and cheese fries. You can still participate from a comfy chair.

Fatigue it my number one enemy.  It cuts me down with one swoop and then stabs me to be sure I stay down.  Coffee and soda are the poison of choice for many.  But, as caffeine is a diuretic and liquids have to exit the premises, these are not always good options for those of us dealing with tight time limits on the bladder.  The caffeine crash is another unsavory blow.

I have found timing is everything.  Time medication and naps to your daily needs.  My secret weapon is caffeine gum.  Chewing caulk-like gum is gross, but it gives me a wee kick without frequent trips to the potty.  Using the potty, for me, has its own gymnastic routine.  It also means using precious energy.  I feel like a gnat in winter already.  I cannot afford to use energy on potty breaks.

Take summer slow.  Summer days drift away so fast, but enjoy it too.  MSers are great at balancing.  Enjoy what you can, when you can and however you can.  Sitting in a lumpy cooling vest chewing caffeine gum is far better than missing out.

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Where Did It Go?

I can’t believe that summer is halfway over! I remember as a kid my parents telling me that time speeds up as you get older and to treasure how summer was. Of course being the precocious child I sometimes was, I would respond ‘Oh please, you’re pulling my leg. Time is still the same no matter what”. But… my parents were right. Time has seemed to speed up and it’s weird but not being in school and having summer break to look forward to, the start of another school year to dread and those 3-ish months to soak up and enjoy as much as possible free afternoons and outings with friends, time and the summer just go running by. Remember when summer was special, it was what you lived all year for? You counted down the days right around Memorial Day. Started planning what you were going to do the first day off, how many times you were going to go to the pool, mall, movies, amusement park, Maria or Tim’s house (insert your own childhood friends names of course). The smell of summer, the warm breezes and long hours of light, it was all you could do to keep yourself in your desk ’til the last bell on the last day of the year. Then summer seemed like this endless thing in front of you.

Nowadays summer is the pretty much the same as spring and fall and winter. Work, weekends, occasional days off. Appointments, errands and holidays sprinkled in. Summer is going by pretty quickly and from time to time I sit in my car after a long day at work, on my back patio on a Saturday morning, or on a walk down some nearby trails and think where in the world did the time go. I know we’ve all heard it before ‘Make the most of the time we are given’ or ‘Stop occasionally and smell the roses’ and they seem like ancient clichés that we smile and nod to when people older than us expel them for our benefit. But truly as someone who is at 31 finally, albeit slowly, learning the value of the time I have, I’m telling you… stop for even a few seconds and really take in the sunrises and daylight that lasts past 8pm, cool breezes on hot days and small moments of reflection in this second half of summer before it’s gone. Slow down for a moment and just… take it in. Take in the here and now, the age you are and where you are. Appreciate the things you have and try not to dwell on the things you don’t. Appreciate the sunrises and sunsets, the ocean breezes off the shore, green leaves building canopies over walkways, the light streaks the sun makes thru windows, the sounds of kids playing without a care in the world. Don’t let time just go whizzing by and before you know it end up realizing that it’s August 31st and then think ‘Where did the time go?’.

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