Loneliness, Being Alone, and MS

One of the MultipleSclerosis.net contributors, Cathy Chester, recently published an article about MS and the feelings of loneliness—and how they are different from just feeling alone.  Cathy’s words really resonated with our community members, and we received a lot of amazing feedback about how other people deal with feelings of loneliness and MS. Here’s what they had to say:

Enlisting the Support of Animal Companions

“My constant companions, my dogs, the best friends you could have. I am glad I have my dogs, they are far more loyal than any human being I’ve met in decades”

“I’m thinking of getting another dog. I had dogs all my life, I don’t have any dogs now, and I think they will be able to benefit me. Hopefully, this will add to curing my loneliness”

“I work, read, watch TV and spend time with my dog. He is almost 10 and he is the reason I fight for what I do have”

“The only thing that really helps is my dog. He’s older, so not as active. He gives me the strength to continue in this world. He makes the days better. I don’t go many places without him”

“I don’t mind being alone at home, in my own space with my cat”

So many of you talked about leaning on a furry companion when you’re feeling down.  Pets can provide many benefits when living with a chronic condition, so long as you consider the means required to take on a full-time furry friend!

Finding Hobbies that Soothe the Soul

“I keep my mind occupied with my hobbies. I love TV and movies. I love reading for hours and hours at a time”

“I can still see enough to read my kindle, I have TV, and although not a fan of daytime TV, I have lots of DVDs. It could be worse, I know. So you just keep plugging along as best as possible”

“I can relate, some days are rough, but I try to sew a little every morning, which was something I enjoyed when I was young”

“Playing games on my tablet keeps my mind occupied most of the time”

While not all of our favorite hobbies are possible all of the time, many of you reported finding new hobbies or amending old ones to fit your new lifestyle.  TV, puzzles, sewing, low-impact exercises like yoga or stretching, or even just watching funny YouTube videos can provide a distraction and pick-me-up when you need it the most.

Adjusting Your Outlook

“I truly believe that God expects me to do something that might help others cope. We did not have a support group, so I started one in my area and I am very active in our MS Walk each year”

“I do what my body allows me. I used to be very active, now I take my happiness from what I can do. I have a lot of naps now. I don’t stress over things, it’s no good for me”

“I still try to push myself to do everything I can as often as I can. I have found that a lot of times when I sit and plan out every step involved in going out, which we have to do within reason, I can become overwhelmed and staying home seems safer. However, if I take proper precautions and don’t overthink it, most of the time I end up feeling so much better that I went. It takes a lot of effort, but usually pays off”

While we can often feel like MS is an insurmountable journey, there are many of you who have shared small mental shifts that have led you to positive outcomes.  A full mindset revolution may not always be possible, or even beneficial all the time, but sometimes, slowly embracing change, even when everything seems bleak, could be a step in a new, and positive, direction.

No matter how you combat your loneliness, just remember, you are not alone.  Our community is always here for suggestions, or even just an ear to listen when you need. Please continue to share your experiences with MS-related loneliness with us, we love hearing from you!

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Comments

  • Trish says:

    My dogs keep me company. I love to read .. I’m thankful for MS support groups on Facebook as I am alone and I only have my son and one good friend (though she takes care of her Mom and has a boyfriend, at least we talk on the phone. My son is busy so I really only get emotional support via text but it’s helpful.

  • Kevin says:

    I’m lonely and tired of going through all of this alone

    • MSAA says:

      Hi Kevin,

      Thank you for sharing, and I am sorry that you feel lonely and tired. If you are looking for resources, or even just a kind voice to talk to at the other end of the phone, please consider reaching out to our Client Services Specialists on our toll-free Helpline at (800) 532-7667, ext. 154 or you can always send them an email at MSquestions@mymsaa.org.

      Take Care,
      Emily from MSAA

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