The Neuropsychological Evaluation for People with Multiple Sclerosis: Part II

By Dr. Lauren Strober

For many individuals, medical testing, especially testing for cognitive changes, may cause fear or anxiety.

How scary of a process is it?  For some, undergoing cognitive testing when one has already noticed a decline is very intimidating – many fear that noticing a change is not as scary as confirming there is an actual change.  But, like anything, knowledge is best and with MS, knowledge is the best way to tackle a variable, unpredictable disease.  Moreover, more often than not, individuals find that they are doing better than they think and that although there are some weaknesses, they also still have their strengths. Again, knowledge is power.

As far as the process itself, a full neuropsychological evaluation can last anywhere from three to five hours and is typically divided over a few days.  Cognitive testing can be extremely tiring and that is not just specific to MS.  Many patients report needing a nap after!  But, most neuropsychologists are aware of this and will offer breaks and other accommodations to make the experience as painless as possible. After the evaluation is completed, you will receive written and verbal feedback as to how you did and what the recommendations are based on your individual cognitive profile. Such feedback and knowledge of one’s abilities and difficulties can be very empowering and assist individuals with taking the right steps in assuring that they can tackle their MS and its symptoms head on!

If you feel that you can benefit from cognitive testing and/or are noticing changes in your thinking, do reach out to your neurologist or a neuropsychologist in your area today.

*Dr. Lauren Strober is a board-eligible clinical neuropsychologist with over a decade of clinical and research experience in MS.  She is a Research Scientist at the Kessler Foundation and presently holds a National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant examining the factors most associated with employment status in MS.

Share

Getting a Second Opinion When You’ve Been Diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis

So when I was diagnosed with MS, a general Neurologist diagnosed me. Everything was so hectic at the time; I was just trying to understand what was going on … and why I needed to get IV Steroids…

I had never heard of MS, so I was trying to find out everything I could about it. Once the initial shock wore off, I had multiple people ask me if I had received a second opinion. At the time, I was getting aggravated, wondering why everyone was in denial, when I was just trying to cope w/ the changes going on in my life.

I finally decided to get a second opinion, not only from a different neurology office, but also from an MS Specialist.

I can honestly say, that was the best decision I had ever made. Come to find out my general Neurologist was intelligent, yes, but didn’t know as much as my MS Specialist did, and it turns out I was being over medicated on things…

I honestly don’t think I would be where I am right now in living with MS, if I hadn’t gotten that second opinion, which others were suggesting I do. I later learned that a lot of people get a second opinion, or want to see a Specialist in the MS field to ensure they are receiving the best care possible.

I know some people who have had more than 2 or 3 opinions on their diagnosis, and I’m glad I only had to make one change in neurologists, rather than keep on searching.

It’s very odd to think back and see the difference in the opinions of my previous and current neurologist. While they are both very well educated, they just treat their patients differently than one another. Which, in this case, was a VERY good thing. (Did I mention that my diagnosing neurologist stuck me SEVEN times, yes that’s right SEVEN times, to get my spinal fluid for a lumbar puncture aka spinal tap.)

I think all patients should exercise their patient rights… if you aren’t comfortable with your current neurologist (or any physician for that matter) you have a choice to find someone you are comfortable with. It’s a VERY important matter, considering your health is in their hands, so to speak.

Share