Latest Issue of The Motivator Now Available for the MS Community

savas2The Motivator is MSAA’s award-winning magazine provided to the MS community and to our generous supporters. Distributed twice per year, this publication addresses the physical, emotional, and social issues that arise with MS, and provides information and support to many individuals affected by this disorder.

We’re pleased to announce that the Winter/Spring 2014 issue of The Motivator is now available to read!

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Cover Story:
The Emotional and Psychological Symptoms of MS
… The symptoms of depression, anxiety, and pseudobulbar affect (PBA) are described, along with effective treatment strategies. Important information is also given on how these symptoms affect roles and relationships, sexual function, and self-image.
Read the full story

Feature Story:
…Competitive “biosimilar” drugs may soon be considered for approval. Read about how these “highly similar” drugs may affect procedure, treatment, and cost.
Read the full story

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Program Notes:
…Details on MSAA’s new Swim for MS online Aquatic Center are highlighted. This national program initiative supports the awareness, understanding, and availability of swimming and aquatic exercise as a positive wellness opportunity for the MS community.
Read the full story

Read the latest issue of The Motivator

 

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Celebrating our Earth

African-American family standing in park

With the hassles of our daily lives, it is often difficult to stop and smell the roses. When rushing from one place to another, we may miss the beauty around us. With so much going on in our personal lives, we need to be reminded to practice self-care, and take a break. This Tuesday, April 22nd, take a break from the hustle and bustle and enjoy your surroundings. April 22nd is universally known as Earth Day, the one day out of the year that we are reminded to honor the environment and pledge to respect our Earth.

This Earth Day, take a moment to enjoy what nature has provided. Throughout the country, many individuals choose to participate in community wide Earth Day events; here are some ways how you can celebrate the Earth in your own home.

Use power minimally:

  •  Allow the sun’s natural light to enter the home and light up your surroundings.
  •  Utilize nature’s natural dryer and hang clothing outside to dry.
  •  Unplug electronic devices that are not in use.

Prepare a fresh local meal:

  • Check out your local farmer’s market and support local agriculture. Click here to find one near you!
  • Try to avoid the oven – prepare a fresh dish from your findings at the market.

Garden:

  • Plant a tree, or flowers for your home. Trees, shrubs, and grass all help to eliminate carbon dioxide from the air.
  • Ask your local gardening center for tips on low maintenance plants and the best plant for your area.

Reduce, Reuse and Recycle:

  • Learn about your community’s recycling program. Many cities offer programs to encourage recycling!

What activities do you have planned to celebrate our earth?

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Time to Cool Down – Cooling Vests for MS Heat Sensitivity

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Though spring has just begun for many around the country, some individuals may already
be thinking about the upcoming summer months and what that means – heat! For individuals with MS who experience heat sensitivity with their MS symptoms, the idea of facing the heat and humidity the summer season brings can be stressful. But it’s important to know there are some ways you can cool your body down and feel some relief with those hot and humid days. MSAA offers a Cooling Equipment Distribution Program which provides different ice-pack style cooling vests and accessory options that can be worn on the body for relief from the heat. With differing vest styles ranging from those that can be worn under or over your clothing, and kit accessories that include cooling wrist and ankle wraps, the program has something to fit individual needs. For more information, see the MSAA website at http://mymsaa.org/msaa-help/cooling/.

*Please note the program eligibility requirements within the application.

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Spring into Action

Spring into Action

Well, it’s officially spring… although I know a lot of people up north would disagree with the cold weather… but I thought I would talk about some of things that I do to “Spring into Action” around this time of year.

Since the weather is actually REALLY nice in Texas right now, I’ve been trying to spend a lot of time outside… and for those of you who enjoy the outdoors as much as I do, there are some things we need to take into account. Like… how long should we stay outside? For me, it’s all about reading the signs my body gives me. If I start to feel overheated, I go into shade, or go inside. If I’m REALLY overheated, like I get in the 100+ Degree Weather we have in Texas during the summer, a cold shower always helps!

Now, before it gets TOO hot outside, there are some things you can do that will help you manage the heat later on. Do you have any MS Cooling Packs? If not, I highly recommend checking out MSAA’s Cooling Distribution Program. I’ve come to find that the Cooling Neck & Upper Spine Wrap, from Polar Products, really cools my core temperature. Also, there are those little Wrist Cooling Wraps that help as well. Also, when sitting outside on those hot summer days, I LOVE my Cooling Seat Cushion. Now these are just my personal opinion that I’ve found through trying different types of cooling products that help me out, and that I also don’t have to put on under clothing.

When it comes to any type of cooling product used for Heat Intolerance & MS, I feel like it’s a personal preference. The ones listed above are what I use when I’m just sitting outside, watching the kids play, etc. But when it comes to doing things outside like going on walks, yard work, etc. This is when I would use my Cooling Vest. There are A LOT of different types to choose from, so again, personal preference. By clicking on any of the links above, it will take you to different things offered by Polar Products. But there are other Cooling Product Companies out there; I just listed the ones that I have personally used.

Now, I know that a lot of us made some promises to ourselves for the New Year to become more active, eat healthier, etc. I’ve been doing that… and I have a gym membership… and I can say that the exercise that I can do the easiest is swimming. I did make sure that the gym I got a membership to had an INDOOR pool, because with the way the weather has been lately, you never know what you’re going to get.

I’m not going to say it was REALLY easy beginning exercising regularly again, but I do enjoy it. I think one of the most frustrating things I’ve been dealing with is the fact that I was so used to what I was able to do BEFORE I got MS, when I was in Athletics in school, Swim Team and things like that. But I’ve come to the realization that if I don’t want to overdo and aggravate my MS & MS Symptoms, that I have to make a new routine. It takes time, but I feel like I have more energy now. I don’t go to the gym every day, but I do try and walk a little bit on the days that I don’t.

Now about this whole “eating healthy” thing… let me just say that I am a born & raised Texan, and I love my southern food and Mexican food… so this is a REALLY tough issue! I’m not being REALLY intense with it, but I am watching my portions and things like that. I won’t ever be able to stay away from carbs and all of that yummy stuff that I crave, so I decided I wasn’t going to make a plan that I wasn’t going to fully stick with. But by watching my portions and having small snacks in between meals, it’s pretty easy, for me anyway. Oh, and let me just tell you that I am a VERY picky eater and don’t eat the suggested fruits and vegetable intake that you’re supposed to, but I did find a yummy supplement at a health store that I mix with water in the morning and drink that with my breakfast (it tastes like candy, by the way) and that way, I have had my “suggested daily fruits and veggie intake.”

Okay – I hope I didn’t overload you with all that information, but I did want to cover a few of those topics that I know are really popular right now. I hope everyone is outside enjoying the weather- if it’s not too cold, that is.

For more information about Resources for your MS, check out MSWorld’s Resource Center.

Best Wishes!

Ashley Ringstaff – Volunteer for MSWorld.org

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Spring Cleaning

To many people springtime symbolizes a fresh start. The change in seasons from winter to spring offers hope and the opportunity to make changes and do some “spring cleaning” for many. When people hear this term, different pictures may come to mind, like cleaning the house, washing windows, or cleaning gutters in preparation for upcoming summer months. However, the concept of spring cleaning can represent anything you want it to. One type of cleaning can be shown in the physical sense – like washing floors, walls and windows. Another form can include straightening out closets or reorganizing drawers and files. Or in another sense, this spring cleaning can be more personal in nature, one in which the ‘cleaning’ occurs on the inside. It may be an opportunity to make changes or adjustments to old routines, to set new goals, or to just make time for yourself, to clear your mind and open yourself up to new possibilities. Spring cleaning doesn’t have to mean giving the house a makeover; it can mean something more personal and private – a cleansing of sorts that may not necessarily be visually captured, but a cleaning that you know has occurred.

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Is There a Relationship Between MS, Allergies and Histamine?

By: Matt Cavallo 

Spring is in the air. So is pollen. With the pollen, my seasonal allergies are in full bloom. I am still sneezing from the last time I stopped to smell the roses. With my seasonal allergies at their peak, I wondered: is there a correlation between multiple sclerosis and allergies?

When I started my research, I was instantly disappointed. All of the initial research pointed to no correlation between MS and allergies. In fact, a 2011 study by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) titled, Association between allergies and multiple sclerosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis, concluded that there was no connection between allergic diseases and MS.

While the initial research suggested no direct correlation between MS and allergies, the deeper I dug, a relationship between histamine and multiple sclerosis started to evolve. According to the Encyclopedia Britannica, histamine is a “biologically active substance found in a great variety of living organisms…In an allergic reaction—the immune system’s hypersensitivity reaction to usually harmless foreign substances (called antigens in this context) that enter the body—mast cells release histamine in inordinate amounts.” The definition goes on to explain that the antigens can cause inflammation. After reading this research, my questions became: Does the inflammation caused by these antigens contribute to MS symptoms? And is this partly why I feel worse when my allergies are at their peak?

My questions lead me to research more about histamine and MS. As it turns out there are research studies ongoing exploring the relationship between MS and histamine. A study of histamines and MS on Science Daily found an “unexpected connection between pathways involved in autoimmunity and allergy and suggests previously unrecognized connections between these very different types of immune responses.” The NCBI concluded in a 2013 study, Elevated CSF histamine levels in multiple sclerosis patients, that MS patients had higher histamine levels than the control group and that further exploration was needed.

I am not a scientist, nor am I a doctor. I’m just a guy with MS and bad seasonal allergies. I know that when I feel crummy due to my allergies, that my MS symptoms seem to flare. There are two sides to the argument: one suggests no relationship between MS and allergies, the other suggests that a key immune response to allergies, histamine, may play a role in multiple sclerosis. Until they are able to figure it out, I’m still not going to stop and smell the roses. Hopefully with science and research, one day I will be able to.

Resources:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20456246
http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/267004/histamine
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110131133317.htm
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23659456

*Matt Cavallo was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2005. Matt is an MS blogger, author, patient advocate, and motivational speaker. Matt also has his Master’s degree in Public Health Administration. Matt is the proud father of his two sons, loving husband to his wife, Jocelyn, and best friend to his dog, Teddy. Originally from the Boston suburbs, Matt currently resides in Arizona with his family. To learn more about Matt, please visit him at : http://mattcavallo.com/blog/

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April Artist of the Month: Celebrating the Work of Artists Affected by Multiple Sclerosis

MSAA is very proud to present our 2014 Art Showcase - celebrating the work of artists affected by MS.

We have received many wonderful submissions from across the country and are delighted to share their work and their stories with you. Please visit our online gallery to view all of the new submissions.

April Artist of the Month:
Carolyn Bowlus – Los Osos, CA

 View of Puget Sound by Carolyn Bowlus

“I grew up in a family of amateur artists, so it seemed natural to try my hand in the art world. I dabbled in acrylics and watercolors with a few art classes along the way.

When I was diagnosed with MS in 2000, I had visual and migraine issues which now come and go. When I am in remission I go back to my art hobbies with great enthusiasm. It is something I have to look forward to during the “down” times.”
Read more

Be inspired – please send an online card featuring artwork by MS artist Carolyn Bowlus and spread awareness of MS and MSAA.

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Reducing Internal Stressors and the “and, AND, AND” Mentality

Closeup portrait of cute young business woman

Stress is something that everyone confronts in their lives. Stress broadly falls into two categories – external stressors where another person or entity is pushing you harder and asking for more, more, more (more of your time, more of energy both physical and mental, and more than you can handle). I think everyone is familiar with the external stressors- a school deadline, a boss that keeps piling more on your plate, appointments and activities you need to get to…these can all add external stress.

The other lesser acknowledged form of stress stems from internal pressures. Internal stress arises when you place restrictions, parameters, and deadlines on yourself, where you strive harder and work longer and try to be “perfect” or to be everything you think you can and should be for everyone and more.

I’ll give you an example. The schedule says you work from 8-5 and get an hour for lunch, that is the schedule you are paid for BUT the phone is ringing, and a new project is assigned, and the work is piling up (external stressors) so your internal response is to come in a little early and only take 20 minutes for your lunch breaks and maybe on some days you stay a little later too. Before you know it you are working 5-10 additional hours each week. Sure you are getting the work done but you aren’t being compensated extra, and everyone else is taking their lunch breaks.

Sometimes people use internal stressors because they are motivated by something specific (i.e. if my boss sees me accomplishing so much maybe I can earn the promotion, and some day make it to the corner office) or maybe you love your job and are motivated by what you think you can accomplish (i.e. I’m saving the world one day and one life at a time, GO ME!) but whatever the reason at some point those additional self-imposed stressors will catch up to you. And frankly at the end of the day while your boss might acknowledge all of your hard work it is just as likely that they will raise their expectations of you, so that without a big promotion you are stuck doing all the extra work and if you try to cut back on the “extras” your boss may wonder why you can’t accomplish what you used to!

These internal stressors don’t just apply to the workplace, they may cause anxiety over what you need to do-“I’ve got to clean the house before Janice comes over to visit, but when will I have the time and energy.” If Janice is truly a friend she will understand that life got in the way and that your house can’t always be impeccable. Don’t worry, Janice already knows that you are human.

You may be asking why is it important to acknowledge when a stressor is internal or self-imposed and try to reduce those actions or thought patterns. Stress is well known to impact health. Stress has been attributed to developing or exacerbating changes in mood such as increasing worry/anxiety, but stress has also been linked to physical health including affects to sleep, cognition, and increasing levels of burnout/fatigue. On the more severe end of the spectrum, stress has been linked to heart attacks, ulcers, and has also been correlated with MS Relapses among other health issues. So, while you may not be able to stop your boss from dumping 500 projects on your desk or keep your house in a perpetually spotless state, you can put in place an internal protection system: Remind yourself that there will always be work for tomorrow no matter how much work you do today, and that friends, family, and neighbors don’t expect you to be “perfect.” Finally, let yourself know that it is okay to ask for help when you need it. Don’t be your own worst enemy, prioritize your health and try your best to stop or reduce that internal voice saying and, AND, AND.

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So Long March…

It’s time to say farewell to another month in the calendar year, and for most around the country, a hopeful farewell to the end of winter. It’s been a harsh season for most of the US, so with the end of March we welcome a warmer, though often rain consumed month of April. As we embark upon the end of this busy month, it also marks the end of Multiple Sclerosis Awareness Month, though only formally on the calendar. MS Awareness has the ability to continue the whole year round, and though its promotion in the month of March draws to a close, the MS community can continue raising awareness for the disease throughout the year. Continuing to increase education, advocacy and support for those with MS are some of the goals the community continuously strives for. So while the month of March comes to a close, it brings with it the opportunity to enter a new phase of the year with the same objective: to increase awareness of MS.

March MS Awareness Month calendar Graphic

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Announcing MSAA’s New Online Aquatic Center

Online Aquatic Center

MSAA is pleased to unveil the Swim for MS online Aquatic Center at SwimForMS.org – an exciting new resource for individuals with MS and healthcare professionals.

Swimming and other forms of water-based exercise have well-established health benefits for many fitness levels. For people diagnosed with MS, the cooling and buoyant properties of water can create an ideal exercise environment allowing for movements that may not be possible on land, while keeping them from overheating. Research suggests that the benefits of water-based exercise for individuals with MS include improved flexibility, muscle strength, mobility function, psychological well-being, and overall quality of life.

The Swim for MS online Aquatic Center features resources developed to help you learn more about aquatic exercise, including the following sections:

• About Aquatic Exercise and MS – Comprehensive information about the benefits of aquatic exercise and how water-based activities can be adapted to fit all levels of ability Tip Sheetand types of MS
• Aquatic Resources – Tips and suggestions on how to begin an aquatic exercise program and where to find a pool in your area
• Multimedia Center – Inspirational videos of people living with MS who incorporate swimming and aquatic classes into their healthy lifestyle plan
• For Healthcare Professionals – Research findings and supportive information on aquatic exercise and MS for neurologists, physical therapists, rehab specialists, and aquatic fitness instructors

To learn more about aquatic exercise and MS, please visit our new online Aquatic Center at SwimForMS.org!

The Swim for MS online Aquatic Center has been developed through a collaborative sponsorship with Genzyme, a Sanofi company.

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