MSAA Motivator: Wellness in Multiple Sclerosis


MSAA’s latest edition of The Motivator features an updated design, with printed and digital versions available.

Included in this issue of The Motivator:


  • Cover Story – Wellness in MS: How good food choices, exercise, correct posture, and other lifestyle changes can have a positive influence on your overall health.
  • Up Front – MSAA’s president and CEO gives a special message to readers, reflecting on his 16 years of service to MSAA.
  • Research News – Updates on recent news items occurring since the last issue of The Motivator are featured.
  • Program Notes – MSAA’s new aquatic fitness DVD, plus My Health Insurance Guide, are both highlighted.

Throughout the month of October, aligned with the release of latest edition of The Motivator, MSAA Client Services staff and guest bloggers will continue to highlight the impact that a wellness strategy can have on an individual with MS. Discussing topics such as diet and exercise, mental health, and social wellness, we hope to continue the conversation about wellness and learn from each other’s experiences.


Mental Illness Awareness Week

Mental health awareness

Each year Mental Illness Awareness Week occurs during the first full week of October. Every year there is a recurring theme that spreads across the country. This year, the theme revolves around building a movement through the Stigma Free initiative.

“Being Stigma Free means learning about and educating others on mental illness, focusing on connecting with people to see each other as individuals and not a diagnosis, and most importantly, taking action on mental health issues and taking the Stigma Free pledge.”

The hashtag for the theme is #IAmStigmaFree

According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness 1 in 5 adults experience mental illness in America. Mental health stigma affects each and every one of us as well as the people we love. Stopping Mental Health Stigma is an imperative first step which provides those who silently struggle with mental illness, the opportunity to reach out for help.

Did you know that the risk of suicide was 7.5 times higher among persons with MS than the general population? In a study of individuals with MS who experienced thoughts of suicide, one-third had not received any psychological help. If you have concerns regarding mental illness, or thoughts of suicide, please reach out for help. Depression is a treatable condition and needs to be discussed with the doctor.

For more information regarding Depression and MS, please visit the MSAA website at

National Alliance on Mental Illness:


October 2015 Artist of the Month: Celebrating the Work of Artists Affected by Multiple Sclerosis

MSAA is very proud to present our 2015 Art Showcase – celebrating the work of artists affected by MS.

We have received many wonderful submissions from across the country and are delighted to share their work and their stories with you. Please visit our online gallery to view all of the new submissions.

October Artist of the Month:
Bean Fairbanks – Seattle, WA

 Bean Fairbanks - Blowin in the Wind

About the Artist:
“All of my life, I have been part geek and part artist. Since 1987, I have been living with multiple sclerosis. One of the consequences/opportunities of MS has been that I have had to reinvent myself over and over again to maximize my current talents and surmount obstacles. That has been true of my career as well as my art work. Over the years, I have crafted with charcoal, pen and ink, pastels, acrylic and oils as well as my first love: textile arts.

Now most of artwork is augmented digitally. My laptop is much more forgiving of my hand tremors than pen and ink! The computer allows me to bring my artistic vision to light. Art remains my inspiration, therapy, passion and a means to communicate. My artwork is as eclectic as my moods, whether reflecting frenzy, sensuousness or the bare essence of being.”
Read more

Be inspired – please send an online card featuring artwork by MS artist Bean Fairbanks and spread awareness of MS and MSAA.


Highlights from MSAA’s Annual Golf Tournament

On Monday, September 28th, MSAA hosted the annual Gary Wallace Memorial Golf Tournament at Little Mill Country Club in Marlton, NJ. The golf tournament is held in memory of Gary Wallace, MSAA’s former Vice President of Finance & Administration, who devoted himself to improving the lives of people living with MS.

It was a full day of fun and friendly competition, all in the name of fulfilling MSAA’s mission of improving lives today for the entire MS community.

IMG_20150928_133858 IMG_20150928_134848 IMG_20150928_153142

We would like to thank all of our supporters, sponsors, volunteers, and everyone who came out to the event.

Thank you!!


No Routine Schedule with MS

By: Matt Cavallo 

There has been nothing routine about my schedule lately. Between traveling for work, the kids going back to school and everyday stress of life with multiple sclerosis, I am wiped out. My last flight was particularly exhausting. It seems that every time I travel, the airlines come up with new ways to delay my flights. This past one last week was a flat tire. Yes, a flat tire delayed me for two hours on a one hour flight to Santa Barbara.

That is the thing about life. There is relatively low predictability. Those of us living with MS love a predictable schedule, but the truth is that circumstances outside our control force us to adjust on the fly. The problem is that if we don’t keep up, we get left behind. So how do I manage to keep up with a busy schedule while dealing with a chronically fatiguing disease? Here are some tips that I use to make my hectic schedule a little more manageable.

3 Tips for Managing a Schedule with Multiple Sclerosis

1. Prioritize and Plan Ahead – Prioritize neurology, other doctor appointments or medical procedures ahead of time. There is limited availability for these medical services and spots fill up fast. If you know that you need a neurology follow-up, MRI, etc., plan six months ahead of time and book it. This will reduce the stress of trying to get an appointment at the last minute, which may cause the extra stress of having to juggle other items on your calendar.

2. Keep a Calendar – Whether electronic or paper, you need to have access to calendar reminders when planning your schedule. I cannot tell you how many times I have double booked myself because I did not refer to the calendar in my pocket. Using today’s technology will allow you to be prompted for important events or forecast possible conflicts. With MS you have enough to worry about, let the calendar manage your time, so you don’t have too. I know once I did, my stress of wondering what I had next was gone.

3. Let Go of what you can’t Control – This is perhaps the hardest lessen to learn. So you have prioritized, planned ahead and calendared an event. Then something unexpectedly flares up derailing your schedule. This is OK. It is bound to happen. Last week, there was nothing I could do about the flat tire on the plane. Some in the crowd went to customer service. Others went up to the gate agent. Most waited in some line for two hours asking questions about an event they couldn’t control. I sat in my seat and waited for the tire to be changed. After all, I would rather be a little late then try to land on a flat tire.

Living with multiple sclerosis is tough. It can be a chronically fatiguing condition that makes you feel like you are constantly trying to catch up with those around you. Don’t let your schedule contribute to your MS fatigue. Use my 3 tips for managing a schedule with multiple sclerosis. Remember to prioritize and plan ahead, keep an up-to-date calendar and let go of what you can’t control and you will find the everyday stress of keeping your time melt away.

*Matt Cavallo was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2005. Matt is an MS blogger, author, patient advocate, and motivational speaker. Matt also has his Master’s degree in Public Health Administration. Matt is the proud father of his two sons, loving husband to his wife, Jocelyn, and best friend to his dog, Teddy. Originally from the Boston suburbs, Matt currently resides in Arizona with his family. To learn more about Matt, please visit him at :


Season of Change

Leaf PicIt’s that time of year again when the leaves are changing from green to yellow to red. What a beautiful time it is before they fall from the trees and we have to rake them up in the yard. This is a great time of year to go for a drive on a scenic route to see the beautiful scenery. Remember to pack a camera or take a quick shot with your phone!

The change of the season gets me thinking about how we accept change in our lives. Just like the seasons change, our lives change. Changes in your life require faith, dedication, and perseverance. Did you know that the true test of intelligence is not how much we know, but how we behave when we don’t know what to do?

Some people know that they need to make changes in their lives. But often find themselves taking the path of least resistance and don’t make the changes even if it means remaining unsatisfied. People stay in relationships that aren’t good for them. They keep jobs that bring them no joy. There is nothing wrong with change, especially when it has the potential to bring happiness.

The world around us is constantly changing. By being open to change we open ourselves up to learn the lesson that this change has for us. When we take this approach to change, we will accept it as a powerful, positive force in our lives.


Managing the Hectic Schedule

“It’s how we spend our time here and now, that really matters. If you are fed up with the way you have come to interact with time, change it.” –Marcia Wieder

While many things in life may seem out of our immediate control, there is one constant that has the ability to change; time. While we can’t make more hours in a day, we can change our perception of time and how our days will look.

Start your day off right. While preparing for the day, take a moment to jot down a few notes on things that need to be accomplished. Personal calendars, phone reminders, or dry erase boards are a helpful way to organize tasks.

Take into consideration MS symptom management. When planning out the day, consider your MS symptoms. Are you more productive in the early mornings, or late afternoons? Does your MS disease-modifying treatment cause symptoms or side effects? If so, make sure to plan around your treatment dosage time.

Reprioritize. It’s OK not to check everything off of your to-do list in one day. Sometimes that’s easier said than done. Take a moment during the day to look over your list and consider what not to do that day.

Time management is a personal journey. What works for someone might not work for everyone, but it is nice to hear how others plan their days. What tips or strategies do you use to manage your hectic schedule?


Back to School: The Importance of Rest and Recovery

By: Meagan Freeman 

As a mother of 5, I have always looked forward to that special time of year when my children head back to school! It was a long, hot summer this year, and I spent my days without the usual daytime break I always need during the school year. Summer can be incredibly difficult for parents with MS, and children are often left bored at home, looking for entertainment. Temperatures often hit the 90s-100s in my area, and on those very hot days I was left a virtual prisoner, trapped at home in the A/C with children who were not often pleased. Most MS patients require a certain amount of rest during the day, and noise can become a tremendous irritant. Without a break, we often become fatigued and emotionally spent.

My children returned to school early this year, on August 24th. My oldest left for college this year, and it was surreal to help him pack up his things and head out. Though I was saddened a bit, I also thought to myself with a twinge of guilt: “Check one off the list!” The first day back was chaotic, dragging exhausted children out of bed early and forcing them to dress, eat breakfast, and get out the door begrudgingly by 7:45 AM. I have found that planning ahead and organization are the keys to success with a large family, and I always spend the evenings preparing everything needed for the morning. Lunches and snacks are packed ahead of time, clothes are in piles according to child, and backpacks are in a neat line ready to be carried out. I have issues with memory loss at times, and I find that failure to plan ahead leads to disaster. I recommend using electronic devices to plan out calendars for the week, setting “alerts” for important times and events. After forgetting to pick children up on early dismissal days several times last year, I have learned to mark out the important pick up times well in advance.

We jumped in the car on that first day of school, everyone in new outfits and excitement in the air, and made our way around town to multiple schools, into new classrooms and new adventures. After the last child left the car, I drove home slowly, sipping my coffee with a sense of great relief. I walked in the door of my home, to a quiet and peaceful spot for the first time in months. I took a deep breath, and realized that at last, I had some free time for myself.

Through these yearly experiences, I have come to understand that I need time for rest and rejuvenation. It is not a luxury for me, but rather a medical necessity. Without a chance to “recharge the batteries,” we just don’t function well as mothers and fathers with MS. Though childcare can be incredibly expensive during the summer, I would advise all parents with MS to factor in some time to rest. Those precious quiet moments are exactly what the doctor ordered, and we should all begin to see rest as a medication or a treatment, something that our disease demands. Even if a friend or family member might give you a bit of respite and take the kids for a few hours occasionally, this would be of great benefit. We should all take a bit of time to care for ourselves, so that we might care for our families in the best possible way. Happy Back to School!

*Meagan Freeman was diagnosed with RRMS in 2009, at the age of 34, in the midst of her graduate education. She is a Family Nurse Practitioner in Northern California, and is raising her 6 children (ranging from 6–17 years of age) with her husband, Wayne. She has been involved in healthcare since the age of 19, working as an Emergency Medical Technician, an Emergency Room RN, and now a Nurse Practitioner. Writing has always been her passion, and she is now able to spend more time blogging and raising MS awareness. She guest blogs for Race to Erase MS, Modern Day MS, and now MSAA. Please visit her at:


It is Never too Late to Make a Change

This time of year sets the stage for big changes in many people’s lives. Little kids prepare for the first day of school. College students embark on a new journey that will change the course of their future. And parents start to see their once little child becoming more independent and less reliant on their help.

As we age, it appears that everything changes and sometimes we accept those changes and sometimes we don’t. For many, change is a scary thing and is met with some resistance or animosity. But for some, change can be exciting and refreshing.

Which category do you fall? Do you find yourself resisting change, or do you fully embrace it?

It is never too late to make a change in your life. A change does not necessarily need to be an overhaul, perhaps something small that you have put off for some time. With the long holiday weekend, it provides an extra day to do something for yourself that may make a significant transformation for the better.

So give it a shot, allow yourself to move freely through the change. If you come across any resistance or hesitation, ask yourself why. Change does not have to be absolute. You have control over your life and if after making the change you find that it does not work for you, you have the power to make the switch.
What is something you have thought about changing?

MSAA Office’s will be closed Monday September 7th in observance of the Labor Day Holiday.


September 2015 Artist of the Month: Celebrating the Work of Artists Affected by Multiple Sclerosis

MSAA is very proud to present our 2015 Art Showcase – celebrating the work of artists affected by MS.

We have received many wonderful submissions from across the country and are delighted to share their work and their stories with you. Please visit our MS Art Showcase online gallery to view all of the new submissions.

September Artist of the Month:
Barbara Hall – Jersey Shore, PA

 Barbara Hall - Autumn Walk

About the Artist:
“I believe this is my fourth year entering the MSAA Art Showcase. I continue to take painting classes and hope that I am making progress. My MS might have affected my handwriting but not my paintbrush! I hope to continue to paint through 2015. I am honored to be included with all these talented artists.”
Read more

Be inspired – please send an online card featuring artwork by MS artist Barbara Hall and spread awareness of MS and MSAA.