The Other Part of Wellness: Emotional Awareness

Throughout the month of January, we have discussed our personal journeys in wellness, but one piece has been missing. Often when we describe wellness, we think of physical activity and healthy eating. But one important piece that hasn’t been discussed is emotional wellness. Emotional wellness is defined as “being attentive to your thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, whether positive or negative” (University of California- Riverside).

In the daily hustle and bustle which is our lives, we forget to think about our feelings and often brush them off or push them away so that we can deal with another task we have been given. The idea behind emotional wellness is to not allow ourselves to push our feelings away.

Becoming aware of your thoughts and feelings can be difficult.  One way to start becoming more aware is to journal. For those who have never kept a journal, starting is the hardest
shutterstock_73933420part. In a previous blog, Dear Diary, I discuss some helpful tips to get started.

Perhaps writing about your feelings is not your thing, maybe talking more openly with a friend or family member would be easier. In everyday conversation, try tuning into your feelings and discussing them more openly. Avoid words like “good,” “fine,” or “OK.” These words are often used when asked how we are feeling, but are not “feeling” words. Some more descriptive feeling words can include “relaxed,” “alone,” or “delighted.” These words provide greater meaning to your emotions and will help you to better understand yourself.

In what ways do you maintain your emotional wellness?

References:

http://wellness.ucr.edu/emotional_wellness.html

 

Share

Family

“Let us make one point, that we meet each other with a smile, when it is difficult to smile. Smile at each other, make time for each other in your family.”

-         Mother Teresa

 “There is no doubt that it is around the family and the home that all the greatest virtues, the most dominating virtues of human, are created, strengthened and maintained.”

-         Winston Churchill

Sometimes they can drive us crazy. We can argue, bicker and disagree on just about anything. I remember one Thanksgiving where my uncle, who thinks of himself as a turkey specialist, complained of how the turkey looked undercooked. He argued with my mother (the cook) about it all day, and yet continued to eat piece after piece of it even before the rest of the meal was finished. Yes, our relatives can really have their moments. We find that they can be our greatest allies, and yet some days, present us with our greatest challenges. They are family, and as the saying goes, “can’t live with them, can’t live without them.”

But there can be moments of such love and warmth within a family that have the ability to trump unforeseen obstacles, lighten unbearable situations, and bring insight we may have overlooked. At the end of the day we are who we are, and reflecting on the love and support of our “family,” biological or not, can oftentimes help us to face an unpredictable day. Share some of your memorable family experiences and the moments that make you feel loved by those closest to you…

 

Share