Community Thoughts on Apologizing for MS

The impact of MS on a person’s every day life can be profound. There are good days, and then other days that are just downright terrible, for a whole host of reasons. One of the contributors at MultipleSclerosis.net, Nicole Lemelle, wrote an absolutely touching story about one of her particularly bad MS days where she had embarrassing trouble with incontinence, and her husband stood by her side. She shared: He asked me “Are you alright?” Totally embarrassed, I shook my head yes and continued to softly cry. He lifted me to my feet and walked me over to the toilet. I sat there while he helped me get my clothes off and then assisted me as I got into the bathtub. I ran the water and he got me towels. As I sat in the tub soaking he cleaned the urine off the floor. It was taking him a while as it had spread throughout the bathroom. I sat in the tub watching him. I started to think that he didn’t sign up for this. If I were only normal again this would have never happened. I just kept saying, “I‘m sorry. I‘m sorry. I‘m sorry.” From his hands and knees while crouching in urine, he looked at me and said, “Don’t ever apologize for having MS.”

Nicole’s story struck a chord with our community, and so many people reached out to share their thoughts and stories with us. Here is what they had to say (and to read Nicole’s full article, click here.)

It’s hard to deal with bad MS days

  • Reading anything from Nicole usually makes me cry, and today is of no exception. I’m stuck in bed going on a month now with my latest “perfect storm”. Ear infections in both ears, a sinus infection, and the recent diagnosis of Mono is simply too much to handle right now. I also got the bad news that I’m too sick to fly to Florida and see my son graduate from high school. MS has taken so much from me that I don’t recognize myself anymore.
  • ‪I wish we MS people could all just get together and have a good cry sometimes.
  • I feel so out of place at times.
  • I can sadly relate to every word! I don’t remember what normal was like. I find myself often wondering what my life would have been like, if not for MS.
  • I’m saying a prayer for you. Your post made me cry, for you, for all of us. I’ve missed “normal” the past few years, but especially the past few months. It’s gotten very hard. I almost don’t remember what “normal” is, and maybe that’s a good thing.
  • I work a full time job and also have epilepsy (seizure free 10 years now). I have to do my shot on Friday night which, in turn, takes my Saturday away because I am sick. Not much of a life. Makes me so angry
  • I’m forever apologizing!
  • I feel like I have been put in a corner my family buzzing around me. I feel like a nonentity and like I shouldn’t be around
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  • Thankfully my husband and now grown children understand completely. However my mom, who is staying with me for the next six weeks, just worries and does not understand if I take a nap that lasts until the next day. She fears something is wrong with me but won’t accept it MS that is wrong with me. My husband is away on business for the next three weeks causing me to do all the tasks at home. Cooking, cleaning, shopping. Things I could always do without a thought or care and now I struggle to complete and suffer after.
  • When I got my diagnosis last summer I cried on my husband’s chest as he hugged me. I have so much guilt of putting him through this life with this and that I may have given this to my kids. I miss me and I miss our lives before this. We were long distance cyclists, runners, skiers, scuba divers, horseback riders and now…?

I no longer apologize for my MS

  • I used to apologize all the time for being unable to do things and finally I woke up! I was at a family event and my mother was pushing me to do something I was unable to do and I apologized, and then suddenly it dawned on me, and I said NO, I do NOT apologize! I can’t do this and it’s NOT my fault, whether you want to believe it or not I’m ill and you shouldn’t even ask me to do it.
  • Reading your words made me feel more normal (what’s normal anyway?), made me sympathize, made me cry for myself and for anyone else with any nasty disease to deal with BUT your words made me realize that I don’t have to be SORRY for having MS.
  • I like everything you said about not apologizing. Right now I’m in the hospital and asking so many people to help do things at my house. I HATE IT!!! Someone is going to stay there. Meanwhile I have no clue what my body is doing this time. I’m scared I won’t return to how I was last week. I want someone to be there for me like your husband. Mine left years ago because I was no fun

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  • I also have been struggling for 20+ years. I’m 47, and I feel exactly the same way every day but we are alive and on this earth if only just to comfort & support…be strong inside.
  • I have never felt the need to be normal, before my diagnosis and after. Normal is boring. I have always been different and always embraced it. As they say, “different stokes for different folks.
  • And I thought I was the only one with a husband that goes above and beyond! He’s always trying to fix things-it’s sweet, but every now and then I have to remind him I’m not fixable at the moment! He means well
  • Oh my God. This is my story as well, but it happened in the hallway on carpet. My husband didn’t bat an eye. It’s just carpet he said.
  • I don’t feel I need to apologize for not being able to do something.
  • After your initial diagnosis of MS there is no normal. I have learned to appreciate the good days and plow through the bad days. Reading what everyone writes helps me know I am not alone. God bless you all.
  • Sounds like my husband. I am totally blessed with a man who loves me despite this horrid disease
  • Please don’t be discouraged. Your life has become something different. It’s hard to imagine, but life has a strange way of presenting new realities sometimes. Your husband is an angel sent to help; I too have an angel and I am thankful every day.
  • I remember before 2006 I would go out have fun, dance. I don’t do any of that any more, especially at night. At around 3:00pm I start going down hill. If I’m up and out I try to be home around 3. Having MS truly changed my life. I have a truly wonderful caring husband who loves me unconditionally. GOD made that possible.
  • This IS normal! And it’s not like we camped out at MS headquarters to get a jump on anybody else so we could be first to get this great disease. Nobody knows why we get MS, but I’m pretty sure it’s not our fault. We do the best we can on any given day. And if wetting our pants is part of that day, then so it is. It’s messy, but how bad is that? I’m glad you have loving patient partner to help.
  • I have been re-reading this article over the last couple of weeks. It so touchingly addresses the fear and shame that underlies the diagnosis of MS I’ve been getting my head around since February. Always the strong person, the one who is leaned on, who am I if my strength is gone? Well, reading your words shifted that perspective. Your sharing of this shows your strength, the strength of your relationship and the guts to look at things in the eye. Thanks so much for sharing this.

What about you? Do you find yourself apologizing for your MS? Please share your thoughts with us!

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Comments

  • Chrissy says:

    I started a new medicine yesterday because I guess the other ones I took wasn’t working. I took a leave from work because I didn’t know how the side effects would effect me at work. I found my self feeling guilty for not being there for my coworkers since everyone depends on me for help and asstance. They all appreciate me not like my family at home who thinks I’m a super women and should be able to cook,clean,entertain and drive everyone to their destination at all times even when they know I’m having a bad day. I realize today that I need to take care of me first other wise I won’t be able to be there for anyone else.

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