You Are Your Own Best Advocate

Recently I went to my primary care doctor for an annual flu vaccine and physical exam to make sure everything was in check. I paid my copay when I arrived at my appointment per usual protocol, but after reviewing the Explanation of Benefits (EOB) from my insurance company that came in recently, I realized the appointment was considered preventative and I should not have had to pay my copay amount. After noticing this I called my doctor’s office and they told me that in fact there was now a credit on my account of the copay amount that I had paid. They asked me if I wanted it to stay on my account as a credit or if I wanted to be refunded the amount. This made me scratch my head in perplexity, because I realized if I hadn’t reviewed my EOB from the insurance company and contacted my doctor’s office myself, I would’ve essentially been left in the dark about this copay credit until maybe I’d gone to my primary care doctor next year and was surprised with the copay credit on my account.

I feel like this happens often to individuals who are just trying to follow up with and maintain their medical care. I think this is why it’s so vital to be your own advocate when it comes to reviewing insurance information and benefits because there are not many on the other side that will do this for you, be it insurance companies or medical offices. Now don’t get me wrong, there may be some representatives who are diligent and careful in their work and do their best to ensure accuracy, however, this may not always be the case so it’s good to check and re-check things on your own as well. Human error can occur and mistakes can happen, but if you’re not aware of your own benefits and coverage this can slip under the radar and you could be paying for things out of pocket that you didn’t have to.

Insurance benefits and coverage can be a tricky thing to try to understand, so it’s important to take one thing at a time and to make contacts when you have questions. Calling the insurance company can sometimes be challenging so set aside time you know you can dedicate to this, or maybe your doctor’s office can help you navigate and understand your benefits. Sometimes you can use online customer support services to contact your insurance or connect to patient portals through your doctor’s office too. A relative, friend, neighbor or other resources in your community may also be able to help you decipher your insurance coverage. Again, you are your own best advocate when it comes to your care so being thorough and asking questions and reviewing your benefits is an essential part of the process.

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