The Art of Reflection

By: Meagan Freeman

The start of a new year brings with it the opportunity for each of us to do an internal review, analyzing the things we experienced during the past 12 months. With an illness like MS, we are constantly challenged to evaluate our treatment choices and lifestyle decisions, and this time of year is a wonderful time to do some reflection. How did we feel during the past year? How many relapses occurred? How are we feeling now compared to the previous year? Are there things we would like to change, or are we content with our current state of health?

Life with MS brings constant, daily “fluctuations,” with some symptoms appearing and quickly disappearing, and others seeming to accumulate and resolve very slowly or not at all. I find that looking back over an entire year, comparing full years rather than days, is more helpful in determining whether my treatments are successful. It is important to keep an optimistic attitude despite our condition, and try to see the coming year as a time of opportunity and renewal.

I always like to spend time around January 1st reflecting on the past year; doing a sort of “life review,” and analyzing the success, failures, and learning opportunities. I am always amazed at how many things have changed during the year, and it takes the perspective of time to realize that. Sometimes, we feel that everything is “stuck,” standing still, and no progress is being made. However, if we simply turn back and look at how far we have come, we can see that everything changes.

Often, I hear other MS patients asking why a cure hasn’t been found yet, why it seems that no progress has been made. I would argue, quite the contrary. From a historical perspective, we can see incredible progress. We have come such a long way in our fight against this disease, even though we haven’t quite reached the end of the battle. We have 13 disease modifying drugs in 2016, and in 1992 there were none. Isn’t that a striking statistic? In just over 30 years, MS has gone from being untreatable, to having 13 possible treatment options. Much progress has been made, and we need to try to keep our collective eyes on the finish line, toward the inevitable day that will bring an ultimate cure for this disease. There is much to be hopeful for, and much to be grateful about. Never lose hope, and stay strong knowing that you are never alone. Happy New Year to all!

*Meagan Freeman was diagnosed with RRMS in 2009, at the age of 34, in the midst of her graduate education. She is a Family Nurse Practitioner in Northern California, and is raising her 6 children (ranging from 6–17 years of age) with her husband, Wayne. She has been involved in healthcare since the age of 19, working as an Emergency Medical Technician, an Emergency Room RN, and now a Nurse Practitioner. Writing has always been her passion, and she is now able to spend more time blogging and raising MS awareness. She guest blogs for Race to Erase MS, Modern Day MS, and now MSAA. Please visit her at: http://www.motherhoodandmultiplesclerosis.com.

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About MSAA

As a national nonprofit organization, the Multiple Sclerosis Association of America is a leading resource for the entire MS community, improving lives today through vital services and support. MSAA provides free programs and services, such as: a toll-free Helpline; award-winning publications including a magazine, The Motivator; website featuring educational videos and research updates; S.E.A.R.C.H.™ program to assist the MS community with learning about different treatment choices; a mobile phone app, My MS Manager™; a resource database, My MS Resource Locator; equipment distribution ranging from grab bars to wheelchairs; cooling accessories for heat-sensitive individuals; educational events and activities; MRI funding and insurance advocacy; and more. For additional information, please visit http://www.mymsaa.org or call (800) 532-7667.

Comments

  • Sherri Plair says:

    I would like to get feedback for those who have progressive ms, struggling to walk. Difficulty in walking. Any update on progressive ms for patients who are having trouble walking?

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