Wellness Covers A Wide Field

By Lauren Kovacs

Staying well encompasses physical and mental skills.  Everyone has different needs and tricks.  The key is to find what works for you.  Maybe you choke up on the bat or spit in your glove.

For me, gluten reduction helps me stay ‘well-ish’.  Eliminating it completely caused massive weight loss.  I figured it out when my beloved donuts caused me to be super floppy.  It turns out too much sugar contributed to the wet noodle effect too.

I did therapeutic horseback riding for years.  It improved my gait, when I had one.  After years, I had to give it up.  I was wobbly and I was seriously freaking my Dad out who was my official side-walker.

Turmeric seems to help me be able to walk some. I use a walker in the house to keep my circulation going.  Yoga helps, if you have energy.  I like seated Yoga or I find exercises geared to seniors.  I try to be active while reducing falls by being seated.

I schedule my day of any activity between 9-12. Not ideal, but I am worthless after lunch.  I am in a different body, after lunch.  I take half my “awake” medicine, nap and take the other half to get me through homework time with the kids.  Combating fatigue is like walking a tight rope. One bobble one-way or the other will make you crash.

Be patient with yourself.  We are standing in front of a pitching machine.  It takes a lot of practice and there is a learning curve.  You have to be ready to take a hit too.  Strategy is important.  Sometime you can smack the pitch and others you swing and miss.

Just like selecting your pitches, select how you respond to want MS throws at you.  Days where you strike out miserably are going to happen.  Maybe the pitch hits you and you have a bruise, but you advance to first base.  You now have knowledge about avoiding that situation again.  In my case, I learn to avoid a fall that way again.

Learn to treat yourself.  Cheer yourself on out load.  Positive affirming words to yourself out load can have a big impact.  Just like a cheer squad helps to push a team forward, cheer for team YOU.

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About MSAA

As a national nonprofit organization, the Multiple Sclerosis Association of America is a leading resource for the entire MS community, improving lives today through vital services and support. MSAA provides free programs and services, such as: a toll-free Helpline; award-winning publications including a magazine, The Motivator; website featuring educational videos and research updates; S.E.A.R.C.H.™ program to assist the MS community with learning about different treatment choices; a mobile phone app, My MS Manager™; a resource database, My MS Resource Locator; equipment distribution ranging from grab bars to wheelchairs; cooling accessories for heat-sensitive individuals; educational events and activities; MRI funding and insurance advocacy; and more. For additional information, please visit http://www.mymsaa.org or call (800) 532-7667.

Comments

  • Lisa S says:

    Laura, I really enjoyed your post. How and how much turmeric do you take? I’ve read in several places that it’s a great anti-inflammatory, but have yet to use it. I’m glad it helps you; I was lucky enough that MS wasn’t severe during my kids’ school years, although in retrospect, a few people at their schools DID know, but I realize they really didn’t understand. I would ask for help during an attack, but they seemed puzzled when I looked fine later. I guess I just wasn’t in a good place to try to explain. Looking forward to learning about your turmeric strategy!

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