What do you want people to know about MS?

Living with a chronic condition like MS can be very difficult and frustrating.  Explaining to others what it’s like to endure life with MS can be even more frustrating.  Our community members have shared with us what they wish others knew and understood about MS.

Of the many symptoms that trouble those with MS, one of the most common that is misunderstood is fatigue.  MS-related fatigue is hard to understand, yet it is so important for family, friends and caregivers to comprehend.  All of us have experienced fatigue at one point or another, but MS-related fatigue is like no other.  MS fatigue is significantly different than fatigue experienced by those without MS and it is important to recognize the differences.

“MS related fatigue is not the same as being tired.”
“MS fatigue is not caused by losing out on sleep.”
“MS is exhausting and can cause extreme fatigue and horrific pain.”

MS fatigue is present no matter what. The simplest of tasks become incredibly difficult, and it takes so much energy to do things that others take for granted.

“Simple tasks like taking a drink or going to the bathroom are unbelievable difficult.”
“No amount of sleep or rest will help my fatigue.”
“It’s not like you are too exhausted to do something, it’s that you are too exhausted to do anything.”
“I’m not lazy, I just hurt and need to rest.”

Although fatigue is one of those invisible symptoms, it can significantly interfere with a person’s ability to function at home and work.  Our community members dealing with MS want others to know that fatigue is a real issue and it affects their daily life immensely.  MS-related fatigue can cause cognitive impairment, clumsiness, and poor balance.

“Fatigue is something I encounter at some point every day of my life.”
“My fatigue occurs on a daily basis.”
“Fatigue can come on suddenly, which means I have to cancel plans on short notice.”
“My fatigue comes on easily and suddenly and can worsen as the day progresses.”

Our community members shared with us that along with their fatigue, comes stress, anxiety and depression. The frustration can bring on anger and impatience.  It is so important for family and friends to understand where this is coming from.

“Pain makes tolerance hard.”
“I get so frustrated with myself and I get angry with others.”
“I have less patience for people and things.”
“I never used to be short on patience, but in recent years, my fuse has gotten very short.”
“At times, my anger can rise more quickly and there are fewer filters.”
“I snap at everyone but don’t mean to.”

Our community members also wanted others to know the true “invisibility” of MS.

“I may look fine on the outside, but I feel terrible on the inside.”
“MS makes you appear normal on the outside, but wreaks havoc on the inside.”
“Others can’t necessarily see our limits, as we see and feel them.”

It is also important for our family, friends and caregivers to know that MS is a constant battle.

“It’s on my mind always, even when I feel well.”
“MS is something you think about every day.”
“It’s unbelievably hard to live with-mentally, physically and emotionally.”
“This is not something I chose.”

Finally, our MS community members wanted others know that life is not easy and every day can be a different challenge!

“It’s a roller coaster…you have ups and you have downs, twists and turns, except it’s never fun.”
“No two people progress the same.”
“It can knock you off your feet at any time.”

One common theme that came up frequently from our community, and stands on it’s own as a constant reminder:

“It’s out of my control.”

 Educating the people in your life, though often challenging, can help you receive the empathy and understanding you so deserve.

Share

Comments

  • Sharon says:

    How do people with MS get financial assistance to make it possible to stay at home when a home needs to be made handy capped accessible in side for an electric wheel chair.?

    • Angel says:

      Thank you for reaching out Sharon, there are various resources and organizations that could possibly help with financial assistance to make accessible home modifications and changes. If you’d like, please contact the MSAA Helpline at phone (800) 532-7667, ext. 154 or email MSQuestions@mymsaa.org for assistance. Thank you and take care.

  • slz says:

    When you have ms fatigue is likeyour on an endless treadmill. You never know when its going to smack you hard in the face and sit you on your butt.

  • Leave a Comment

    NAME:

    EMAIL:

     SPAM PROTECTION: Sum of 3 + 4 ?

    COMMENT: