National Love Your Pet Day

Dogs, cats, rabbits, hamsters, fish – no matter the species, pets serve as great companions!

Some pets act as service animals, performing everyday tasks that may be difficult for people living with disabilities. Other animals serve as emotional support, lending an ear whenever you’re feeling down and just want someone to talk to. No matter how you feel your pet supports you, one thing remains clear – pets are always willing to give unconditional love no matter the circumstance.

February 20th is recognized as National Love Your Pet Day, and MSAA would like to help you share your special relationship with your favorite animal!

Please share a picture of your pet with us by adding a comment on the blog or our social media pages. Additionally, feel free to tag us (@msassociation) in a separate post about your pet on your personal social media. We’ll collect all of your shared photos over the next few weeks, and then we’ll post a photo collage on our social media accounts on February 20th in honor of National Love Your Pet Day.

We can’t wait to see your pet photos and hear more about your furry friends!

Share

Finding Companionship in Some Furry Places

February being the “love” month, we thought it may be appropriate to kick-off the month talking about some of our favorite furry creatures! In the past we have discussed the benefits of pet relationships and the positive effects that these relationships can have on one’s health and wellbeing.

With the uncertainty of a disease such as MS, individuals may feel comforted knowing that an animal has had some level of training or certification to meet a specific need. But what do the different titles mean? And which might be the best for your situation?

A Therapy Animal is not defined by federal law and may (or may not) be loosely defined by state laws. The primary purpose of a therapy animal is to provide affection and comfort to individuals, mostly those that live in communities such as nursing homes, or hospitals and schools. Their owners are registered members of an Animal Therapy program, and bring the animals in to visit with clients.

A Service Animal is one that has been specifically trained to perform tasks for an individual with a disability. Different states have different regulations in terms of licensing or certification requirements for service animals. You can check with the office of the Attorney General in your state to discover how service animals are defined and licensed.

An Emotional Support Animal, or companion animal, is a person’s pet that has been prescribed by a licensed mental health professional. The animal is included as part of the treatment plan and is designed to bring comfort and minimize the negative symptoms of the person’s emotional/psychological challenges.

Emotional Support Animals, specifically dogs should be able to:

  • Walk beside you without straining against the leash
  • Sit on command
  • Come when called
  • Lie down on command
  • Show no aggression toward humans or other animals when unprovoked

For more information, or to register your pet as an Emotional Support Animal, visit the National Service Animal Registry website and complete the brief form and pay the registration fee.

By completing this process and certifying your pet as an Emotional Support Animal, you are protecting yourself in several situations. There are laws that protect individuals with service or emotional support animals, including housing and landlord/tenant laws.

While pets require a certain level of commitment and responsibility, this may not be appropriate for everyone’s situation. That doesn’t mean you can’t benefit from the love of an animal.

There are non-profits throughout the country that provide visiting pet services. PAWS for People™ is a non-profit committed to providing therapeutic visits to individuals within their service community who would benefit from interaction with a well-trained, loving pet. To find programs in your area, search “therapy animal” and your city.

Show your #PetLove and share your favorite #MSAAPets stories about you & your pet with us!

dogs

 

For additional information, please visit the sites below:

NSAR- National Service Animal Registry: https://www.nsarco.com/; 866-737-3930

Paws for People: http://www.pawsforpeople.org/; 302-351-5622

Canines Companion for Independence: www.cci.org;1-800-572-BARK (2275)

Paws with a Cause: www.pawswithacause.org; 800-253-7297

Pet Partners: www.petpartners.org; 425-679-5500

Service Dogs for America: www.servicedogsforamerica.org; 701-685-2242

Service Dogs for Independence: www.servicedogsforindependence.com; 520-909-0531

Share

National Love Your Pet Day

photo

In honor of National Love Your Pet Day, the “unofficial” national holiday set aside to give extra attention to and pamper your pet that you love every day. This is a good day to focus on the special relationship that you have with your pets.

Having a pet has proven to provide many physical as well as mental benefits. Therapeutically, a pet can lower blood pressure and have a calming effect over an individual, which can lead to diminishing some pain symptoms. Pets also encourage communication (who doesn’t talk to their pet), as well as provide support and comfort.

When feeling anxious or nervous about a new situation, perhaps lean to your pet for support. A pet is a perfect soundboard for thoughts and feelings and even better, they can’t talk back! Maybe there is an uncomfortable topic you wish to discuss with a loved one, try practicing speaking out loud to your pet exactly what you wish to say. The extra practice in expressing your thoughts can provide confidence and re-assurance in the situation.

While your pets can’t role play the situation back with you, having practiced saying a thought or feeling may help alleviate some of the anxiety around the situation. It may also provide you with the opportunity to hear how your words would sound to another person. Have you ever made a comment and then realized ‘that wasn’t what I meant to say.’ Practicing beforehand allows you to make changes to ensure that your message is properly received.

In what ways is your pet a support to you?

Share