Imagine Your Happy Place

The holiday season is in full swing, and as the year comes to a close, the hectic pace can be stressful.  Running any kind of errand during the last few weeks of the year becomes an adventure as you see more people out and about trying to purchase gifts, visit family and friends, host family and friends, and purchase supplies for all of the holiday meals and get-togethers.  Everyone has their own method for dealing with the holiday season pressures and stressors, and one strategy that might be helpful at this time of year is guided imagery.

Guided imagery is a deep state of relaxation achieved by specific breathing techniques and mental images that reduce stress and feelings of anxiety – think of it as a structured day dream.  This process can help with different types of physical and emotional stress by helping the body relax as you are guided along by a recording. Some benefits of guided imagery can include:

  • Improved mood by calming, relaxing, inspiring, and motivating
  • Reduced feelings of anxiety and depression
  • Lower blood pressure

Most guided imagery is practiced using a recording of someone coaching you on your breathing and a mental image designed to reduce your stress levels. By envisioning an ideal place of relaxation (like a cabin in the woods, or a beach) in this almost meditative state, your body starts to physically relax and react as if you are actually in that place.

The more you practice guided imagery, the easier it can become to find your happy place and relax in a stressful environment, giving you a sense of control over your stress and your body’s reaction to it!

Interested in learning more about guided imagery?  Check out our cover story from the Winter/Spring 2008 edition of The Motivator, Imagine the Possibilities: An Introduction to Guided Imagery and Its Potential Benefits for Individuals with MS.

Share

Mindfulness and Meditation for Multiple Sclerosis

“Meditation can help us embrace our worries, our fear, our anger; and that is very healing. We let our own natural capacity of healing do the work.” -Thich Nhat Hanh

Studies have continued to show how creating a mindfulness or meditation practice can assist those in reducing fatigue, depression, and anxiety associated with living with a chronic illness. Although the study outcomes are positive, individuals are still wary about starting a practice of their own, with fear that they do not know how to start. Starting a meditation or mindfulness practice can be made easier if you create a space in your home specifically for meditation, and commit to a practice schedule.

Creating a Meditation Space
We define the rooms in our home based on their activities. In the dining room, we nourish our bodies and prepare meals for the family. In the living room, we entertain guests or watch television. Defining a space in the home based on relaxation and mediation is important. You have a desk to pay bills, why not have an area to meditate. By designing a space for meditation you are mentally preparing yourself for the task.

You do not need an entire room to meditate, a corner of a room would suffice as long as this is a dedicated space that would not be cluttered or interrupted by others in the household. Decorate your space with images that bring you warmth and peace. Some choose to light candles or incense to promote this sense. The comfort of your space is important as you may be sitting for a long period of time. Pillows and blankets are often used to create a more comfortable sitting environment.

Practice
There are no rights and wrongs to a meditation practice as long as you achieve the desired outcome. Whether this meditation time is to relieve stress or become more in tuned to your body, you should be able to measure the outcome and notice a change. Start by slowly closing your eyes and focusing on your breath. Breathe slowly and deeply, noticing how each breath moves through your body. Don’t force your breathing, breathe as natural as possible; in through the nose and out through your mouth. Let your thoughts flow through you. Calming the mind is often the most challenging part of meditation, but becomes easier the more you practice. Acknowledge the thoughts as they pass through your mind and bring your focus back to your breathing.

Guided meditations can be found online, on CD’s, or even podcasts. Working through a guided meditation may be helpful to a beginner while trying to hone in and create their meditation practice. Remember, there is no right and wrong to this. It may be difficult at first, but that does not mean that you “aren’t doing it right”. Stick with it, start slowly, and keep track of your progress.

Have you developed a meditation practice in your home? How did you define your space?

References:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3882962/
http://www.webmd.com/multiple-sclerosis/news/20100927/mindfulness-meditation-vs-multiple-sclerosis
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3463050/

Share