B & B

By Doug Ankerman

Let’s be frank.  You have MS.  I have MS.  So we have that in common.

It also means we may have similar problems when it comes to B & B.  No, not bed & breakfast.  B & B as in bowel & bladder.

Yeah it’s not enough that MS throws a wrench in the works with our gait, balance, vision, emotions, memory, dexterity and much more – but it also takes a swing below the belt with potty stuff, namely lightning-fast urgency to go and crushing constipation.

But after over 20 years of shared bliss with multiple sclerosis, I’m used to it.  In fact, the bowel and bladder have become such an influential part of my life, I carry their picture in my wallet.

Every day my bowel & bladder taunt me, tease me and pick on me like two older brothers raze the youngest sibling.  So I must stay close to the little boy’s room.  At times it’s like being tethered to the toilet.  I feel like an astronaut on a spacewalk, only getting so far away from the ship.  Or the bathroom in my case.

As a result, I believe my bladder has some type of built-in sensor, like a urological GPS unit.

It knows the location of every restroom near and far.  And like a dog, I must leave my mark in every one.

Another element of MS you probably already know…is the closer you get to the bathroom – the more urgent you have to go.  Sometimes my urge is so strong I begin the whole “unsnapping, unbuckling and unzipping” process before I get the door closed.

And be warned as the “festivities of going” usually begin as soon as your foot crosses the threshold of the bathroom.  The bladder figures “Hey, I’m in the war zone, might as well fire the first shot!”

I could go on why we MSer’s are so consumed with our “B & B’s”, but what’s the point.

We really aren’t that fond of these vital organs, they simply control our every movement…Strike that (Poor word choice)…MSers must keep close tabs of every nuance of our faculties.

Just add it to everything else we have to be aware of, right?

Keep fighting.

*Doug pokes fun at MS and other nonsense on his humor website at myoddsock.com. He also disappoints his family on Twitter @myoddsock.

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The Unspoken Symptoms

As we discuss various MS symptom challenges during this month’s MS Conversations blog, we wanted to talk about some symptoms that may be more challenging to disclose or discuss with others at times. This week we touched on the condition of PBA and its difficulties, but there are also issues with bladder, bowels, and sexual function that are some of the other more private, less disclosed symptoms experienced by those with MS. These symptoms can feel a bit embarrassing to talk about or discuss with others at times, and for this reason are sometimes the ‘silent’ symptoms one shies away from even discussing with his/her doctor. Even though silent, these symptom challenges can be loud in their presence for individuals.

Symptom issues with bladder can vary in MS. Because MS affects the nerve responses sent to the bladder that control sensations and contractions, symptom issues can include difficulties with emptying and storing, or both. There are several different medication treatments along with diet and fluid management planning that can assist with these symptoms. If you experience these issues, talking to your doctor about your symptoms can help to initiate some type of treatment plan to address these issues and help manage them. If your family and friends are not aware of this symptom and its relation to MS, this can possibly be an opportunity for them to learn more about the disease and its symptoms so they have a better understanding of what you’re experiencing. But remember, it is your body and the information you wish to disclose or not is your decision. However, when others are more educated and aware it helps to keep lines of communication open so that if needed, it may be easier to discuss the issues you’re facing with additional support.

Issues with bowel function in MS can be due to various causes as well, including lesion effects in the nervous system and medication side effects. Constipation and diarrhea are symptoms that can occur and be influenced by diet and medication practices. Discussing these symptoms with your doctor can help to form a plan of action to manage the challenges and decrease their effects. And again, while including those around you in your experiences can be difficult at times, it may increase understanding and communication when you want to reach out to talk about some of these more challenging symptoms.

Being a private and personal matter, sexual dysfunction symptoms in MS may not always be disclosed and talked about, even with one’s healthcare team. It can feel awkward at times to discuss such personal issues and the difficulties you may be having. Both men and women can experience these symptoms which can present in different ways; loss of libido, sensation and arousal changes, or even pain during intercourse can occur. Along with medication management for these symptom challenges, counseling can be another strategy used to discuss sexual issues being experienced. Communicating openly about the problems can increase cohesiveness and support amongst partners and allow for discussion of alternative sexual satisfaction practices. Education around the ways in which MS can affect sexual function and intimacy is an important piece and allows your partner to understand what you’re going through and how you can work together to manage it. That is why it’s important to try and include your healthcare team as well, to recognize and talk about the issues in order to find ways to manage the symptoms.

The symptoms that can occur with MS all have varying degrees of difficulty and challenge they bring to those affected. But it’s important to know that you are not alone in your experiences—others have faced similar obstacles and have also been reluctant at times to discuss symptoms. This is another element that MS unfortunately tries to impose on those affected—to intimidate or shame because of certain symptoms. But this elicits the moment and opportunity where individuals with MS can recognize their symptoms and discuss or disclose them as they wish—to educate others and increase awareness to bring MS out of the shadows and darkness and into the light.

What are some ways in which you’ve managed these unspoken symptoms of MS?

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