2016 – A Work-in-Progress

By: Matt Cavallo

Last year at this time I wrote about how small changes can make a big difference in the New Year. Some of the advice from that post included: developing a financial plan, changing eating habits, exercising, getting back on your schedule and setting attainable goals. I used this advice to make major changes in my life which led to a year of self-renewal. This doesn’t mean that I achieved all of my goals. Rather, I found that at the start of 2016, I am still a work in progress. Let me explain.

Exercising was one small change in 2015 that led to a big difference in how I felt. Let me first state that I am no workout warrior and have spent a lifetime of avoiding working out, but I knew that it would make me feel better so I took the leap. I started going to the gym three days a week. Not only that, but I was riding my bike back in forth to the gym to get in 10 miles of cardio each day. I started to see real results in about three months. Then, during a routine work out I felt that I tweaked my neck a little bit. Because of my past multiple sclerosis episodes and ensuing cervical fusion, I wasn’t about to risk further injury. So, I called my neurologist who scheduled an MRI and referred me to physical therapy. My goal for 2016 now include starting physical therapy to strengthen my neck so I can return to the gym and resume my previous work out plan.

Developing a financial plan, setting attainable goals and sticking to a schedule were also critical to my 2015 success. My wife and I set a goal of being able to quit my day job and pursue my writing, speaking and clinical education full time by 2016. In order to do this we needed to get our finances in order and create a schedule that allowed me to build my business while still completing my full-time commitments. This required a lot of work and sacrifices. However, careful planning allowed me to make sure that I fulfilled all my commitments while remaining balanced with family life. In December of 2015, I was able to leave my full-time job and pursue to my business full time. We knew that starting a business while having multiple sclerosis and a family is a big risk but now I am living the life that I always wanted to and my multiple sclerosis is not getting in my way.

The one resolution for 2015 that I failed was controlling my eating habits. It is hard to eat right, especially with traveling for work and raising young boys. As I celebrated my last birthday this past summer, I realized that the pounds were not melting off the way that they had in the past. The holidays added some extra weight and as I am writing this I am ten pounds heavier than I was last year. Those extra ten pounds create fatigue and numbness for me and my multiple sclerosis. Now in the New Year, I have started eating salads for lunch each day and cutting back on refined carbohydrates. I am also riding my bike again. I realize now that the metabolism of my youth is not coming back and that my eating decision can affect my MS symptoms. In 2016, I am making a commitment to make change in my diet for my health and well being.

The thing about it is I have realized that I am in charge of all decisions I make in life. Some of the risks I have taken or the changes that I have made have been tough. The easy thing would have been to do nothing. With hard work and determination I took control of my life and you can do the same with yours. If you are reading this post maybe you want to make changes but don’t know how. The MSAA has great resources in all of these areas from financial planning and fitness to goal-setting and diet.

To start 2016, I am still a work in progress and that is OK. The first step in change is making the decision to do so. Once you have, you’ll be glad you did. From my family to yours, Happy New Year’s. Believe that you can be the change you want in 2016!

*Matt Cavallo was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2005. Matt is an MS blogger, author, patient advocate, and motivational speaker. Matt also has his Master’s degree in Public Health Administration. Matt is the proud father of his two sons, loving husband to his wife, Jocelyn, and best friend to his dog, Teddy. Originally from the Boston suburbs, Matt currently resides in Arizona with his family. To learn more about Matt, please visit him at : http://mattcavallo.com/blog/

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Financial Wellness and Multiple Sclerosis

It is known that stress can have a negative impact on MS symptoms. While individuals may try to manage stress in their lives through exercise, meditation, or positive thinking; financial stress is something that is often swept under the rug and ignored. While ignoring the issue may alleviate the initial stress of thinking about financial matters, in the long run it is not a successful practice and often allows the financial matter to come back more stressful than the last.

Talking about money is tough, especially for those with limited incomes; but not talking about money can do more damage than good. Understanding and truly evaluating your financial situation is a great way to develop a financial plan. Awareness of the in’s (income) and out’s (expenses) can be eye opening!

The Multiple Sclerosis Association of America (MSAA) and National Disability Institute (NDI) collaborated on a series of informational webinars to assist the MS community in learning about strategies to protect and improve their financial well-being.

Through the webinar series, topics such as ‘Being Money Smart’ and ‘Working Towards Financial Wellness’ are discussed. For each topic, you can view the archived webinar and download a PDF version for future use and reference. Information can be found right on MSAA’s website at https://www.mymsaa.org/manage-your-ms/videos/financial.

What strategies have worked for you in evaluating or creating a financial plan?

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Reviewing Financial Statements – Taking an Active Role in Reducing Debt

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How often do you take the time to review your bill statement before you write the check or pay the bill? Not too often, right? As we discuss money management and how to create a budget this month, one important issue must be addressed. As with all things in life, mistakes can happen, and credit card, cable, and medical billing companies are not immune to mistakes.

When a statement or bill comes through the mail, take some time to read through the charges to assure that no added fees have occurred or no changes to the bill have been made. If you are receiving certain credits on your bill, make sure those are being taken off appropriately. Also, make sure that the full payment was received and taken off of the total balance due. If there is something on a statement that you are not sure of, make a call to a company to discuss the charge. Many companies are quick to admit a mistake and will immediately reverse the charge.

Sometimes a phone call to a company can provide additional savings as well; perhaps there is a promotional deal available or a program that you can qualify for to assist with lowering the payment. Making a phone call and taking an active stance towards managing your bills proves to the company that you are in good faith trying to reduce the debt.

What steps have you taken to have a more active role in reducing your debt?

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Managing on a Budget

rsz_distressed_couple_with_calculator_and_paperworkCreating and trying to maintain a financial budget for monthly expenses can be difficult at  times. Some people have to adhere to a strict budget due to their financial circumstances, so maintaining a budget is especially important to ensure needs and responsibilities are  met each month. Making a budget that makes sense to you and can somewhat ease financial concerns can hopefully support your monthly financial planning needs.

Here are some suggestions of what to consider when creating/maintaining a budget, and where to find help:

  • Create a budget that is practical for you to track. Make computer spreadsheets,
    and file or record expenses on paper. Find an accessible way to track expenses that works for you.
  • Make a list of monthly expenses and income resources to identify how much money is coming in and how much needs to go out towards expenses.
  • Keep a record of spending and estimates of monthly bills to identify areas that can be modified, if any, to keep finances on track.
  • Reach out to financial management/budget counseling resources in your area for additional guidance and support. These agencies, sponsored under the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Administration, offer services to help manage finances and provide additional housing and financial counseling services as well.

Budgeting finances can be difficult but necessary for many individuals. Ensuring financial needs are met can be stressful so it is important to reach out for support when needed and find a system that works for your needs. What are some ideas you have to help create a budget?

 

 

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