Highlights from MSAA’s Improving Lives Benefit in Washington, DC

On April 22nd, MSAA held the second annual Improving Lives Benefit at The Pavilion at the Ronald Reagan Building in Washington, DC. It was a wonderful evening filled with good food and fun – all in support of a great cause! The funds raised from the event directly support MSAA’s free, vital programs and services.

Honorees - Doug - Sue

(Pictured from left: MSAA President & CEO Doug Franklin, Honoree Kristen Adams, MSAA Board Chair Sue Rehmus, and Honoree Dr. Randall Schapiro)

This year, two special people were honored as MSAA champions for their accomplishments, commitment, and support of the MS community.

Dr. Randall Schapiro, MS neurologist and member of MSAA’s Healthcare Advisory Council, was honored for his dedication and contributions to the MS community. Among his many notable accomplishments, Dr. Schapiro founded the first comprehensive MS center in 1977, participated in numerous research studies, and helped to develop two MS organizations. Through his years of service, he has come to recognize the importance and impact a “team approach” can have in helping the MS community.

“That’s the way we’re going to make progress. That’s the way we have success in dealing with a difficult disease. So I’m appreciative, very appreciative, of accepting this award on behalf of my team; all of the team; all of the people that have been involved with me and helped me.”

–Dr. Randall Schapiro

Also honored was Emmy award-winning network producer and writer, Kristen Adams. Diagnosed with MS in 2008, Kristen serves as an inspiration to all who hear her story. In early 2014, Kristen played a major role in helping to launch MSAA’s Why I Swim initiative by producing and starring in nationally broadcast videos to inspire others to share their stories.

“I can be a good example. And I know now why that is important and why I continue to do that. And I am deeply grateful to MSAA for allowing me the opportunity to do that. Thank you.”

–Kristen Adams

This year’s Improving Lives Benefit would not have been a success without the support and generosity of our donors. With the help of our supporters, MSAA was able to raise more than $115,000 – which will make a tremendous difference in helping to provide vital programs for so many people affected by MS.

Thank you!

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Let Us Help You Help Others.

Help Sign Shows Lost In Labyrinth

by Kimberly Goodrich, CFRE, Senior Director of Development

In previous blog posts and articles in our magazine The Motivator, I have addressed the controversy over whether charity ratings are really helpful in giving a true picture of an organization’s effectiveness in meeting their mission.

Earlier this month, I attended a luncheon on this topic with Steve Nardizzi, CEO of Wounded Warrior Project (WWP). Nardizzi gave several examples where ratings from charity watchdogs were not helpful in determining if an organization is meeting its mission. In some cases the ratings were even misleading. One example was the Central Asia Institute, formerly run by Greg Mortenson co-author of Three Cups of Tea. When Mortenson was ordered to pay back over one million dollars in misused funds, his organization had a four star rating. How does this help us decide where our dollars should go?

This makes it harder for the donor. There is no one single number that tells us if an organization is doing a good job or not. We need to dig deeper and ask questions about goals and impact – not ratios. Ask about the people they help. Is that number growing? Are they feeding more people? Saving more forests?

WWP continues to grow despite mediocre ratings. Why? Because its supporters see the incredible impact they are having on the lives of wounded veterans. Eight years ago they had higher ratings, but only 10 million to spend on programs. By making a conscious effort to invest in fundraising, marketing, and staff, they now have lower ratings, but spend 176 million on programs for veterans. By ignoring the ratings and focusing their resources on their mission, more veterans are helped. And really, isn’t that what it’s all about?

At MSAA our mission is to improve the lives of those living with MS. Like WWP, the amount we spent on fundraising went up. Some think this is bad. However, this increased fundraising helped our overall rating to go up. This increase in fundraising led to a significant increase in revenue (16.5% growth last year). This increased revenue in turn allowed us to help more people living with MS. Our toll-free Helpline assisted 6% more people. We provided ongoing MRI assistance to 9% more people, and diagnostic MRI assistance to 70% more people than the year before. Our mobile phone app was downloaded by an additional 7,000 people who now use it to track their symptoms and improve their daily lives. These are increases we are proud of and that make the decision to invest in additional fundraising streams worthwhile.

What numbers would mean the most to you? How do you think we should decide if an organization is meeting its mission and therefore worthy of our donations? We’d like to hear your thoughts. Help us help you to help others.

*About Kimberly

I am the Senior Director of Development at MSAA and have worked in the nonprofit arena for over 15 years. I love reading, running, theatre and the Green Bay Packers. I volunteer with the Disabled American Veterans teaching outdoor sports like skiing and kayaking to injured veterans and find that I receive much more from them than I am able to give.

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How do we know if we are doing a good job?

by Kimberly Goodrich, CFRE, Senior Director of Development*

4553-abstract

As the debate continues around ratings, ratios, and watchdogs, nonprofits around the country are focused on how to accurately communicate their value. If ratings do not suitably portray the efficiency of an organization’s operations – then how do we know our dollars are being well spent? What is our impact?

Impact, in the nonprofit world, refers to the change in behavior that is a result of the activities and resources provided. For example, an organization provides a class and information on the health risks associated with smoking cigarettes, and finds that 42 percent of attendees stop smoking, resulting in higher scores on overall health measures at their next checkup. If their mission was to improve health scores by decreasing the number of smokers, then this organization can clearly state this as their impact.

MSAA’s mission is to be a leading resource for the MS community and improve lives today. But how do we measure improvement? And how much improvement is enough? In the previous example, if the smoking-cessation classes improved health scores by 50 percent, this sounds great, but what if they only improved by 5 percent…is that enough? If 5 percent kept that person from having a heart attack, would it then be enough?

The improvement of a life is not easily shown on a graph or a financial statement. Sometimes we need to hear the stories that accompany the percentages and the ratios, the revenues, and expenses. The stories that remind us why we do what we do.

“From the bottom of my heart, I thank you – all of you, for helping me to live independently [through MSAA’s free equipment distribution program]. I put my shoes on by myself!! It has been years since I have done that! Thank you for the leg lifter. It lifted my spirits too!” -F from South Carolina

This is not to say that numbers do not matter. Last year, 1,040,554 people accessed our website for information – 814,776 of them for the first time. That’s a significant number of people who can have their spirits lifted and their lives improved.

MSAA has been able to improve these lives because of an increase in the number of generous donors who support us in this mission. We are incredibly thankful for this growing number of people who, through their vital contributions, experience the joy of creating an impact – and improving lives today!

*About Kimberly

I am the Senior Director of Development at MSAA and have worked in the nonprofit arena for over 15 years. I love reading, running, theatre and the Green Bay Packers. I volunteer with the Disabled American Veterans teaching outdoor sports like skiing and kayaking to injured veterans and find that I receive much more from them than I am able to give.

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How does MSAA improve lives for the multiple sclerosis community?

Last week, we shared an infographic with our supporters showing just a few of the ways MSAA improves lives for the multiple sclerosis community. Today, we wanted to post that infographic again in case you missed it.

But we wanted to start by posing a question: What, exactly, is a “good” charity?* 

There has been a lot of talk recently about good charities and bad charities. News reports have focused on charities that do little, if anything, to help alleviate social issues…and on companies who profit from the increasing need for funding to ensure missions are fulfilled. The nonprofit world is buzzing with words like “expensive ratios,” “ratings,” and “overhead.” The result: We are now taking a new look at what being a good charity really means.

How does MSAA improve lives?

                    How can your donation improve a life today?

As an organization, MSAA welcomes this conversation. We believe in using our resources efficiently to best serve the needs of the MS community. We have worked hard over the years to streamline our processes and improve our program delivery.

In addition to the wealth of information and support MSAA provides, for those who would be unable to afford equipment or MRI scans on their own, MSAA’s programs make a tangible difference in day-to-day quality of life. This is attested to time and time again in the unsolicited tesmionials of our clients.

*Excerpt from “Thoughts about Giving” in MSAA’s magazine The Motivator (Summer/Fall 2013)

Also made possible through the help of our supporters…

1,040,554 visits for vital information through our website

About 215,000 MSAA publications distributed to provide information and support

66,596 views of our 36 on-demand video programs

7,174 new downloads for MSAA’s smartphone app, “My MS Manager”

Donate now and improve a life today. 

You, too, can improve a life today.

“Thank you so much for getting back to me so soon! After over two years of waiting and being passed off [by other organizations], my MRI is scheduled for a couple of hours from now! Thank you!” – Jordan R. from Colorado. 

Improve a life today for someone like Jordan. 

The Multiple Sclerosis Association of America is a leading resource for the entire MS community, improving lives today through vital services and support. 

Improving Lives Today!

 

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