Physical Wellness with Aquatic Exercise

In the past couple of weeks, we have been looking at strategies for finding the best wellness plan for each person, whether it is watching for signs of depression, or making time for physical wellness in the weekly routine.

When it comes to finding a physical wellness routine, it can be difficult to find just the right exercises for individuals with multiple sclerosis who experience heat sensitivity, balance issues, mobility concerns, and other symptoms.

One easy way to combat these concerns, while still getting in a little physical activity is to look into the benefits of aquatic exercise.  Research that has been conducted suggests that aquatic exercise is effective for improving mobility function, cardiovascular endurance, fatigue level, muscle strength and flexibility/range of motion in individuals with MS.

The best part about aquatic exercise is that it is easily adaptable to each swimmer’s experience level and physical ability.  Swimmers who are more comfortable in the water can aim for a higher-level aerobic workout, or they can opt for a slower workout by moving around a pool, with the water providing slight resistance.

If you are looking to incorporate aquatic exercise into your physical wellness routine, keep these tips in mind:

  1. Always be sure to consult your physician or healthcare team before taking up a new exercise routine.
  2. Locate a pool or facility that works best for your lifestyle. If you need help finding a facility that meets your needs, feel free to check out MSAA’s My MS Resource Locator® or you can call our toll-free Helpline at (800) 532-7667, ext. 154.
  3. Set realistic goals for yourself in the pool. Perhaps you are hoping to improve your balance, or simply strengthen your leg muscles.  Communicate this to your healthcare team and your instructors (if applicable) to help you develop a plan to achieve these goals.
  4. As with any exercise routine or aerobics class, communicate with the instructors and trainers about your concerns or questions. You will feel more comfortable in the pool and be better set to reach your goals.
  5. Lastly, have fun! Physical exercise can feel like a chore sometimes, but the more fun you have exercising, the more motivated you are to keep doing it.

Learn more about the benefits of aquatic exercise for individuals with MS by visiting MSAA’s Online Aquatic Center.

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Aquatic Exercise and Finding the Right Facility

Exercise is a great way to help maintain strength and endurance in order to better take care of your physical well-being. There are countless varieties of exercise trends and routines, but traditional exercise isn’t always the best fit for everyone, especially individuals with MS, due to the increased physical demand and rising body temperature.  Research conducted over the years has suggested that aquatic exercise is an effective way for individuals with MS to improve their flexibility, fatigue levels, and (most importantly) their quality of life and psychological well-being.

Take, for example, the way aquatic exercise has affected Mandy Iris.  “I can swim as angry as I want.  I can be as sad as I want, but it all just seems to melt away every time I jump out of the pool.  I feel better. It’s invigorating, it makes you feel alive,” says Mandy. Spending time in the pool and swimming a few laps, or just walking around in the pool can not only help strengthen your muscles, but allows you the time and space to clear your mind.

If you are looking to try aquatic exercise for yourself, and you’ve discussed this with you doctor or physical therapist, here are a few of tips for finding the right facility for you:

  1. Location – Find a facility within a reasonable driving distance or that you can get to using public transportation.
  2. Safety and Accessibility – Make sure that you are able to easily move about the facility and pool deck. Also, be sure that you will be able to get in and out of the pool with ease.
  3. Classes – If it interests you, see if the facility offers any aquatic exercise classes you can attend.
  4. Schedule – Find a facility or a program that works with your schedule, including work, child care, and personal preferences.

You can find more tips, resources, and inspiration to get started on MSAA’s Swim for MS Online Aquatic Center at: aquatics.mymsaa.org/aquatic-exercise/

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I Am Free in the Water

By Simone Sanders

I was an unusually tall child. I stood at almost five feet tall by the age of six. So, naturally, my family began to speculate about my future athletic potential. My grandfather, who was an avid swimmer, decided that my lanky, thin frame would best be suited for swimming. And so my lessons began at seven years old. I remember I felt two things the very first time that I jumped into the pool: cold and free.

On land, I was quite awkward. Being much taller than the other kids left me at the end of the line most of the time. My feet and hands were too big to swap shoes and winter gloves with the other girls in the class and adults always seemed to notice my height first. But the very features that made me awkward on land made me graceful in the water. My big feet helped me swim faster than the other kids. My hands helped me pull water behind my body more efficiently and my height made me superior in a race to the finish line. In the water, I was a winner.

Fast forward twenty years and I still feel like a winner when I swim. Living with multiple sclerosis on land is rough. I walk slowly. My hands and feet are numb and tingling. My vision is blurred from optic neuritis. I am tired all of the time and my brain is sometimes in a fog. But I am free in the water. I don’t have to drag my body because my limbs are light. My hands and feet are both cold so the numbness and tingling stops. My blurred vision doesn’t matter because there is nothing to see in front of me but the finish line. And if I am tired, I float. In the pool I am not disabled. When I am swimming, I am enough.

In a race against MS, I win.

 

*If you are interested in learning more about using your own passion for swimming to help the MS community, please visit SwimForMS.org.

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5 Reasons to Give Swimming a Try

Aquatics PhotoNow that summer is in full swing, are you looking for alternative ways to stay cool while getting in some exercise? Head to the pool! Swimming and other water-based exercise can help with many symptoms of MS, including loss of mobility, balance and coordination, as well as fatigue. And the cool temperature of water can help prevent overheating, which can worsen MS symptoms.

Even if you’re not confident in your swimming abilities or you just don’t like dunking your head underwater, there are plenty of other ways to exercise in the pool.  Many fitness centers and area municipal pools offer aquatic classes including water aerobics, walking, and aquatic treadmill.

Swimming is an aerobic activity, so it’s good for your heart and your muscles. Here are more reasons why you should consider giving swimming a try:

  1. Buoyancy: Water supports 90% of a person’s body weight, reducing joint stress, pain, and fear of falling
  2. Resistance: Water-based exercise builds muscle and enhances stability, flexibility, and balance
  3. Pressure: Swimming allows the heart to work with less stress, reducing swelling and pain in lower extremities
  4. Temperature: Water transfers heat energy more efficiently than air, which can help moderate body temperature
  5. Overall Wellness: Socializing at the pool, having fun, and relating to other individuals can have psychological benefits.

Find more tips, resources, and inspiration to get started on MSAA’s Swim for MS Online Aquatic Center at aquatics.mymsaa.org and check out our Aquatic Exercise and MS – Tip Sheet.

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The Benefits of Aquatic Exercise and MS

By: Matt Cavallo

matt blog

Walking was always something that I took for granted until that one day that I couldn’t do it anymore. Then, as I watched the world walk by me, I yearned to be up on my feet ambling about. The problem was that no matter how strong my mind and determination were, my legs would simply not respond. It was hard for me to understand that the problem was in my spine and no amount of mental fortitude could overcome the spinal lesions caused by multiple sclerosis.

I was confined to small, assisted steps. I was able to travel only from my bed or couch to the bathroom and back. My wife brought food and drinks to me when she was home but when she was at work, I usually didn’t eat or drink. I was ashamed that I lost functionality the way I did. I didn’t want people to take pity upon me. I had always been this big, strong athletic guy and now I couldn’t even walk down three steps to get out of my house.

My doctor was confident that I could regain functionality and learn how to walk again. I wasn’t so sure. He said that the Solu-medrol would act to reduce the swelling in my spine, and little by little sensation would return to my legs. He did caution me that I would have to relearn how to walk and ordered me to have aquatic therapy. I was skeptical, but I gave it a shot.

The results were truly amazing. When I started exercising in the pool, my legs felt lighter and easier to move. The exercises really help to strengthen and balance me on my feet. While I was in the water, I felt free again. After three weeks of aquatic therapy, I was walking with a cane for short distances. I was not negotiating steps or hills, but I could get around the house on my own. More importantly, I was able to go to the bathroom again by myself. I was amazed at my progress. In just three short weeks, I was completely independent with walking.

Today, if you saw me in the street you wouldn’t think that I ever lost function of my legs. One of my secrets is that I continue to work out in the pool. I live in Arizona and can use my pool most of the year.

Now, if you are having immediate problems with strength, balance or mobility, you should contact your physician right away. If you are looking for a strengthening exercise routine that you can do on your own, you’ve come to the right place.

MSAA has a new online Aquatic Center that you can access at http://SwimForMS.org. The Aquatic Center has tools and inspirational videos for the MS community. Some of the resources include: guides for patients and healthcare professionals, a handy tip sheet about aquatic exercise and MS, information on how to find an aquatics facility in your area, and inspirational videos from three individuals sharing their personal stories about how water activities have positively impacted their lives.

Even if you don’t live in Arizona, you can still turn any pool, at any time into your own personal gym while raising awareness for MS.

*Matt Cavallo was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2005. Matt is an MS blogger, author, patient advocate, and motivational speaker. Matt also has his Master’s degree in Public Health Administration. Matt is the proud father of his two sons, loving husband to his wife, Jocelyn, and best friend to his dog, Teddy. Originally from the Boston suburbs, Matt currently resides in Arizona with his family. To learn more about Matt, please visit him at : http://mattcavallo.com/blog/

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Announcing MSAA’s New Online Aquatic Center

Online Aquatic Center

MSAA is pleased to unveil the Swim for MS online Aquatic Center at SwimForMS.org – an exciting new resource for individuals with MS and healthcare professionals.

Swimming and other forms of water-based exercise have well-established health benefits for many fitness levels. For people diagnosed with MS, the cooling and buoyant properties of water can create an ideal exercise environment allowing for movements that may not be possible on land, while keeping them from overheating. Research suggests that the benefits of water-based exercise for individuals with MS include improved flexibility, muscle strength, mobility function, psychological well-being, and overall quality of life.

The Swim for MS online Aquatic Center features resources developed to help you learn more about aquatic exercise, including the following sections:

• About Aquatic Exercise and MS – Comprehensive information about the benefits of aquatic exercise and how water-based activities can be adapted to fit all levels of ability Tip Sheetand types of MS
• Aquatic Resources – Tips and suggestions on how to begin an aquatic exercise program and where to find a pool in your area
• Multimedia Center – Inspirational videos of people living with MS who incorporate swimming and aquatic classes into their healthy lifestyle plan
• For Healthcare Professionals – Research findings and supportive information on aquatic exercise and MS for neurologists, physical therapists, rehab specialists, and aquatic fitness instructors

To learn more about aquatic exercise and MS, please visit our new online Aquatic Center at SwimForMS.org!

The Swim for MS online Aquatic Center has been developed through a collaborative sponsorship with Genzyme, a Sanofi company.

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