Physical Wellness: One Part of the Sphere

We’ve talked about different aspects of wellness here on the MS Conversations blog in the past, and this month as we’ve covered topics related to depression we also wanted to touch on factors of physical wellness too, because all of the elements of wellness can intertwine and are equally important. Living with a chronic illness like MS can make it difficult at times to have control over one’s physical health because of how unpredictable and unknowing the disease course can be. However, there are pieces of physical wellness that a person can try to maintain influence over, even though MS may have other plans in mind.

Daily habits and behaviors can have great influence over one’s physical health and can include things like diet, exercise and sleep practices. With a disease like MS that can affect physical body function, maintaining consistent sleep or exercise routines can be challenging at times. It’s in these cases where people may need to get a little creative and modify/adjust practices to make things work for them. Working with healthcare professionals on symptom management strategies can help with this. Applying good habits to daily routines may improve physical health needs, especially with sleep practices. And though at this time there is no one specific diet known to influence MS and they continue to research this, maintaining healthy eating habits and a well-balanced diet can have positive effects on one’s physical nutrition. Each person is unique and what works for one’s physical health may not for another, so it’s important to evaluate behaviors and choices that can apply to your situation and what your needs are.

Another part of this physical piece includes maintenance and follow-ups when it comes to one’s care. I don’t know anyone who necessarily “enjoys” going to the doctor or hospital, but it’s one of those things that has to be done sometimes. Making sure to see your doctor regularly, notifying them if you’re having an issue or experiencing changes in symptoms are all good habits to try to enforce when it comes to your health. It’s not always an enjoyable experience having to go to the doctor or having medical tests/procedures done, but it’s a way to ensure that you’re doing all you can to keep your care in check and to maintain control over this aspect of your health. There are even tools and resources to help keep communication flowing between you and your medical team for your physical care needs. Though physicality is merely one aspect of the entire wellness sphere, it remains a vital part that contributes to all of the other elements of wellness and to one’s overall care.

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S-T-R-E-S-S, what does that spell…?

As if the whole year round doesn’t bring enough stress, with the holidays approaching and busy end of year happenings, stress can rear its ugly head two-fold during this time. Stress can have negative effects on anyone’s health, but especially for those living with a chronic illness like MS; this beast can cause additional challenges on other symptoms. That’s why it’s so important and crucial to try and reduce stress when you have any control over a situation and it’s possible to have influence over it. Now this isn’t always the case, because as we all know, life tends to be a tad unpredictable at times so control isn’t always a possibility. However, when you do encounter those moments to change things yourself, make it worthwhile and significant to your benefit. So how can you try to manage stress?

SStay flexible. When things occur that you can’t predict or plan for, the stress we place on ourselves as a result can have real consequences. So try to stay open to change; sometimes it may bring good results.

TTalk to others about the stress you’re feeling. Opening up about what’s going on may reduce the inner stress you’re experiencing if you keep things bottled up inside.

RRest and relax when you’re able to. Your body is stronger at combating stress and illness when it receives the rest and care it requires.

EEnjoy simple pleasures and special moments when you can. Life goes by so fast, so make sure to take in the joyous times and happy occasions to hold onto if and when stress surfaces again, it can aid in the fight.

SSocially connect to others who may have had similar stressful experiences and challenges—it can help to learn some different ways to cope and to also know you’re not alone in this.

SSlow down. There’s no need to try and act like a superhero constantly. We are only human. Take time for yourself, do what you can and are able to, and don’t place unrealistic expectations on yourself. You’re already doing your best!

What are some ways you try to reduce stress?                        

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What is an Occupational Therapist?

In the field of medicine there are many specialties that often work together to provide a comprehensive approach to patient care. For those dealing with MS, these specialties can oftentimes blend together, as the symptoms of the disease warrant concurrent methods of treatment. Trying to understand and recognize the responsibilities every specialist has in a patient’s care can be challenging, and in the rehabilitative treatment domain, the role of occupational therapy may be lesser known than other forms of therapy.

Occupational therapy (OT) focuses on treatments used to rehabilitate activities of daily living for individuals with physical, mental or developmental conditions. Working to develop and improve the skills needed to maintain day-to-day living and work habits are the goals of this therapy, with the client being at the forefront of treatment. Things like bathing, eating, dressing, job performance, driving and financial management are some of the areas of focus OT can impact with intervention. OTs work closely with the client, and many times with the family also to create an environment that’s conducive to the client’s needs; this can include the home, workplace, school, or other settings. Making changes that help modify particular tasks and teaching new skills helps clients regain control over their daily functioning and aids in maintaining their independence.

OTs help to create personalized interventions and treatment plans to help clients achieve personal goals of what they ultimately want to perform in their daily routine. Education is a major component of OT, as therapists and clients alike work together to learn what activities need modifying and how these changes can happen. The OT specialty often works in conjunction with other treatment specialists including physical, speech, and language therapists, in addition to other healthcare and social work professionals to develop an inclusive plan for client care.

If you are experiencing challenges with daily living and work activities, ask your doctor about OT to see if an evaluation is appropriate for you. Your doctor may be able to provide further information about this therapy and if it could benefit your needs. For additional information about occupational therapy, visit The American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

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