Stopping Mental Health Stigma

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When you have an infection, you call the doctor. When you have a toothache, you call the dentist. But why when you notice a change in your emotional wellbeing don’t you call a counselor? The mental health stigma (or the view of individuals who seek mental health counselling in a negative way) can have a strong enough effect to stop someone from picking up the phone for help. The idea that an individual is perceived in a negative manner just for the use of mental health services sometimes prevents an individual from seeking care.

In the same ways that the doctor helps cure your infection, or the dentist helps fill your cavity, a counselor or therapist can help guide you through the emotional challenge you may be experiencing. However, fear surrounding the thought of being judged or criticized holds strong enough in some individuals that they will not seek out care.

1 in 5 Americans live with a mental disorder such as depression, bipolar, or anxiety disorder according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness and two-thirds of those diagnosed do not seek treatment. Fears of disclosure or discrimination are some examples of why one would not receive care. Helping to stop mental health stigma opens the doors to mental health treatment and care for those who truly need the support.

Tips for Stopping Mental Health Stigma:

1. Educate those around you about mental health.
Example: With MS, the rate of depression is three times higher than the general population.

2. Use positive language surrounding mental health illnesses
Example: Use phrases such as “a person with depression”; correct people who use inappropriate terms to describe a person.

3. Speak up if you feel you have been discriminated against based on a mental health condition!
Example: People with mental illnesses can experience discrimination in the workplace, education, housing, and healthcare.

Please share your tips or suggestions on ways to stop mental health stigma. By sharing the voices of those in need, we move closer to a world where those who need help no longer fear reaching out.

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What is an Occupational Therapist?

In the field of medicine there are many specialties that often work together to provide a comprehensive approach to patient care. For those dealing with MS, these specialties can oftentimes blend together, as the symptoms of the disease warrant concurrent methods of treatment. Trying to understand and recognize the responsibilities every specialist has in a patient’s care can be challenging, and in the rehabilitative treatment domain, the role of occupational therapy may be lesser known than other forms of therapy.

Occupational therapy (OT) focuses on treatments used to rehabilitate activities of daily living for individuals with physical, mental or developmental conditions. Working to develop and improve the skills needed to maintain day-to-day living and work habits are the goals of this therapy, with the client being at the forefront of treatment. Things like bathing, eating, dressing, job performance, driving and financial management are some of the areas of focus OT can impact with intervention. OTs work closely with the client, and many times with the family also to create an environment that’s conducive to the client’s needs; this can include the home, workplace, school, or other settings. Making changes that help modify particular tasks and teaching new skills helps clients regain control over their daily functioning and aids in maintaining their independence.

OTs help to create personalized interventions and treatment plans to help clients achieve personal goals of what they ultimately want to perform in their daily routine. Education is a major component of OT, as therapists and clients alike work together to learn what activities need modifying and how these changes can happen. The OT specialty often works in conjunction with other treatment specialists including physical, speech, and language therapists, in addition to other healthcare and social work professionals to develop an inclusive plan for client care.

If you are experiencing challenges with daily living and work activities, ask your doctor about OT to see if an evaluation is appropriate for you. Your doctor may be able to provide further information about this therapy and if it could benefit your needs. For additional information about occupational therapy, visit The American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

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