Community Views: Managing a Flare

Prepare for MS flare - an illustration of an MS flare

Part of living with multiple sclerosis (MS) is dealing with flares. A flare, also called a relapse, is when MS symptoms recur or worsen.1 The change in symptoms lasts for at least 24 hours, but often much longer.1 Flares throw a wrench into daily life and plans. They are challenging to manage. Curious about how you handle flares, we recently posed this prompt to our MultipleSclerosis.net Facebook community: “You feel a flare coming on. What is the first thing you do?”

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The Biggest MS Triggers

Blue hand pushing away black web of strings representing stress

In the early days after diagnosis, MS triggers are often a mystery. However, many find that the more time they have lived with MS, the more they know exactly what makes their symptoms worse.

To hear about some personal experiences with MS, we reached out on the MultipleSclerosis.net Facebook page. We asked the community to Continue reading

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What is a Pseudoexacerbation?

For many individuals with MS, the summer can be a difficult time. The heat and humidity may cause MS symptoms to flare and become agitated because of heat affecting one’s body temperature. For some who experience a worsening of symptoms in warm environments, this may actually be an example of a pseudoexacerbation. A pseudoexacerbation is a temporary worsening of MS symptoms, without the presence of actual myelin damage or inflammation. Other than heat, individuals may experience this as a result of other illnesses or infection. It is important to take note and be aware of what symptoms you are experiencing, how long they occur, and your environment surroundings. If you find yourself heat-sensitive, try to avoid warmer settings. Stay in air conditioned places, do outdoor activities either early in the day or after sunset when the temperature is cooler, and wear lighter weight clothing when needed. If you have concerns about or are experiencing new symptoms it is important to be aware of your activity and surroundings, especially during these warm summer months!

For more information on pseudoexacerbation, see the MSAA brochure, Understanding and Treating MS Relapses, https://mymsaa.org/publications/understanding-treating-relapses.

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