Just Take It One Step at a Time- Part 1

By: Amy McKay, M Ed, CSCS, CES

When was the last time that you actually stopped and thought about the process of walking? Did you know that you could actually improve the efficiency and effectiveness of each step you take with a few simple changes? Put your best foot forward as we explore ways to create a great gait pattern.

Efficient walking starts with your brain. Begin to start thinking about walking. Walking is a complex motor skill. It involves balance, coordination, flexibility, and torso stability. As we stop and study each of these topics, I will provide a few useful tips on how to improve each part of every step you take.

BALANCE

Balance is a very important part of walking. With each step taken, there is a brief moment of balance on the foot that is in contact with the ground. Balance is a skill related component of fitness and can be improved with practice. Balance is defined as an even distribution of weight enabling someone or something to remain upright and steady. When balance skills are compromised, the typical compensation is to shuffle the feet, instead of actually placing one foot in front of the other.

Try adding this simple exercise to your daily life to improve your balance.

  • Practice standing on one foot while brushing your teeth, drying your hair, or working at your kitchen sink. The great thing about practicing this skill while in these locations is that you have the counter right in front of your to provide safety and support when needed. Simply start with 5 to 10 seconds at a time and build up from there. You will find that you are more successful on one side than the other, so be sure to practice BOTH sides.

COORDINATION

Are you one of those people that can walk and chew bubble gum at the same time? That seems to be our society’s check point for coordination. Coordination is defined as the organization of the different elements of a complex body or activity that enables them to work together effectively. Our bodies are complex machines that are made for movement. When they are properly tuned up, all of our daily activities, including walking, happen with less effort and more ease. Activities that cross the midline of the body have been shown to enhance coordination skills. Add these activities to daily routine.

  • Alternate reaching your right hand all the way across the left side of your body, then your left hand across right side. Repeat this movement 10-20 times each side per day. This not only enhances coordination, but also is great for the range of motion in your shoulders.
  • While standing with support nearby, alternate touching your right elbow to your left knee followed by your left elbow to your right knee. Start with just 3 or 4 repetitions on each side and then add more as you begin to feel stronger. This activity can help with your balance, coordination, and can provide stability and flexibility training for your spine.
  • Shake things up and take a dance class or just crank up your favorite tunes and move to the beat. Dancing is a great way to enhance your coordination, improve cognitive function, and is a FUN way to get some exercise!

Check back on Wednesday, March 9th for part 2 of Amy’s Just Take It One Step at a Time post.

*Amy McKay is an Assistant Professor at Tarleton State University in Stephenville, Texas. She is a certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist for the National Strength and Conditioning Association, a certified Corrective Exercise Specialist with the National Association of Sports Medicine, a certified Sports Nutritionist and Specialist in Exercise Therapies with the International Sports Science Association, a certified Personal Trainer with the Aerobics and Fitness Association of America, and a Youth Nutrition Specialist with the International Youth Conditioning Association. She is an avid marathoner and tri-athlete. Amy believes that modifying exercise is necessary for everyone and strives to “find a way” for all to be involved. Her personal motto is to make every day “the best day ever!”

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November Artist of the Month: Celebrating the Work of Artists Affected by Multiple Sclerosis

MSAA is very proud to present our 2013 Art Showcase – celebrating the work of artists affected by MS.

We have received many wonderful submissions from across the country and are delighted to share their work and their stories with you. Please visit our online gallery to view all of the MSAA Art Showcase submissions.

November 2013 Artist of the Month:
Julie Crow – Damascus, VA

Jack - Baby boy - artwork by Julie Crow

From the Artist:
“After a couple of really bad falls from lack of balance and coordination, resulting in hip pins and a broken pelvic bone, my companion, Gino, an accomplished oil painter, brought some pastel pencils and a drawing pad to the hospital for me to have something to focus all of my energy on while I was immobilized. In the hospital and inpatient rehab, I drew pictures of friend’s pets and relatives. The baby is a friend’s first grandson, and I drew this from a photo taken at the beach. She was always there for me during the hard times. I have also drawn a few others for folks to show my appreciation for their time and their love. I’ve created a Circle of Hope link with MSAA…the amazing thing is that I’ve never painted or drawn. I truly could not draw a stick man before this last incident. I haven’t lately due to some problems, but am hopeful for tomorrow.”

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Be inspired – please send an online card featuring artwork by MS artist Julie Crow and spread awareness of MS and MSAA.

Calling All Artists with MS:
It’s that time of year – MSAA is now accepting submissions for our 2014 Art Showcase! If you haven’t already done so, submit your best artwork by December 16th 2013 for a chance to be a part of next year’s Art Showcase.

Submit your artwork for the 2014 MSAA Art Showcase.

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