An Ode to Mobility Aids

By Doug Ankerman

As one with multiple sclerosis for twenty-one years, I have much gratitude and thankfulness to share.

Certainly family comes to mind with their heartfelt devotion, care and attention to my round-the-clock stumbling.  My health practitioners earn a much deserved shout-out.  As do complete strangers willing to help load packages into my car, offering their place in long lines, to the deputy opening the cell door.

But this isn’t about them.

This message of gratitude honors the gaggle of mobility aids I depend upon each day.

First, my wheelchair.  My loyal steed.  Though reluctant to use the chair at first, it has become a savior of independence.  Taking me through sun, snow, rain and mud, my wheelchair has jostled my backside countless miles.  It has allowed me to see nature’s wonders.  Witness major events.  And traverse cavernous big-box stores.  Yes, independence would not be possible without my chair and for that I am grateful.

Next, my rollator.  The rollator sits in the garage mostly waiting for yard work to be done.  On those intrepid days, the rollator allows me to walk over uneven grass while keeping my weaving body upright.

Plus the rollator’s basket is perfect for carrying small gardening tools, gloves and chilled beverages on warm days.  (An MSer must keep hydrated, you know.)

Lastly, canes are my everything.  Always within arm’s reach.  Canes allow me to shuffle along without leaving messy fingerprints on the walls.  My canes help me stand.  Canes let me look someone in the eye.  And feel somewhat unburdened.  Although my gait is glacier-esque in speed, I have tried to create an illusion of fleet-footedness with the clever use of Nike swooshes added to their tips.

If you are curious, they didn’t help.  I am still sloth-slow.

My mobility aids have given me life post-diagnosis.  Hand controls, wheelchair, AFO, rollator, Dyna-splint, canes, grab bars, I feel like the Inspector Gadget of disability.  But it is all for a purpose.  A purpose of independence.  And for that I am grateful.

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Thank You, Maybe

By Lauren Kovacs

I admit this is a tough emotion for many MS folks. I am not exactly the “glass is half full,” sparkles, and glitter type. Not sure how I survived as a college cheerleader. Many were bubbly, barf. I was more of the stick in the mud with a giant white bow.

Gratefulness has been a learned trait. I force myself to see the green grass and pretty unicorns. I often see giant animals pooping on my lawn with sharp pointy things on their heads. Many of us have to really try to be thankful. Come on! MS has taken a lot and it is not a generous disease.

Alas, finding thankfulness is hard, but we must try. I would fit in well with a Grinch family, however green is not my color. See, glass half empty!

I have to “cheer” myself on just to get to the bathroom in time.  Finding things to be grateful for takes on a new identity. If I manage to tie my shoe or put elastic in my hair on the first try, I celebrate it.

Small things deserve great thanks. MS folks adapt better than most. I am a lefty, yet I have learned to apply eyeliner with my right hand. I drove my figure skating instructor nuts because I spun like a lefty and jumped like a righty. In kindergarten, I cut paper right but, wrote left. Drove my teacher crazy enough to put me in some special ed. classes. Little did I know that one day this ambidextrous trait would come in handy. That is something to be very thankful for.  I still can’t write right handed, yet every other thing I can do with my right hand.

I learn to be thankful for much smaller things. Simple stuff does matter. Think about just getting through the day. Toilet paper, straws, walkers, naps and all that meaningless stuff is, in fact, deserving of our thanks.

I am thankful my boys can enjoy gluten. Stuffing at Thanksgiving would suck. I am grateful I have enough self-control to resist it. Talk about resisting temptation.

MS reveals how tiny stuff can induce great thanks. I am very thankful for anti-bacterial wipes. I can de-germ my walker and wheelchair wheels pretty easily. Think about where they go. When I did horseback riding therapy, those wheels went over horse poop.

Even though I have had to give up my jeans, being small enough to wear fun kid-size leggings is a trade off. Yes, I have lots of sneakers too, but less of an ankle injury risk than heels. I am truly thankful for that.

It may take some thought, but we can find stuff to be grateful for. It might seem simple to some. I get weird looks for being thankful for my piggy dog, but he cleans up all the food I drop on the floor. He is now on a diet though. Poor guy. He loves food.

I am thankful for having a life jacket. Drowning in my own pool was not on my bucket list. Small things to be grateful for shows humility. It can be fun, too.  I love that I can paint my own nails, if I use glitter polish. Covers the mess well.

When going around the table talking about what you are thankful for, think. Small things show that you have character. It might make someone else see how blessings come in all sizes. I personally, am grateful for whoever invented elastics for pants. Sweet tea is a close second. Electric toothbrushes are a lifesaver, too. No swamp mouth.

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