Life Goals: Checking in When the Seasons Change

By Stacie Prada

When summer turns to fall, a sense of routine and normalcy seems to return to my life. Kids are back in school, my coworkers and I are done with big vacations, and we’re all ready to get back to work. This year it occurred to me to start reflecting on this year and planning for next year earlier than usual. I think this might be Continue reading

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School is in the Air

By Lauren Kovacs

Here it comes! Cooler weather (hopefully) and the munchkins go back to school, as fall arrives. Smell the crispy leaves (or not) and hear the silence. It also means for many of us, no help.

Most of us are masters at adaptation. Embrace the Continue reading

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Is it That Time of Year Already?!

school-bus-back-to-schoolSo this week marked the start of many students heading back to school and the unofficial ‘end’ of summer with the fall season being just around the corner. This time of year usually generates many nostalgic feelings; how it felt having to go back to school, which was sometimes a drag at first but eventually turned into excitement to learn new things, the change in routine and schedules, and the countdown to the holiday season. Even just the colors and smells of fall have the potential to bring about joyful feelings—it can be a very pretty and festive time of year.

For some people this week may represent new beginnings and changes, for others it may signify an anticipated change of season with teasingly cooler temperatures being just around the bend (hopefully). For others it may just represent a hope for change and new things to come. This particular week and time of year doesn’t necessarily look or mean the same to each person and it doesn’t have to; everyone goes through different things at different times and holds unique perspectives towards it. It’s more about finding what is special or important to you and holding onto that—knowing what feelings are prompted or what memories are beckoned when you experience time and season changes during the year. It’s a chance to create new memories, make adjustments to change, prioritize your needs, and most of all, to self-care—because there is only one you, and you deserve the most that time has to offer.

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10 Things To Do Before Fall Ends!

Back-to-school time is here and fall isn’t far behind. Glorious fall!!! I can smell the leaves and cool crisp air, and don’t get me started on how obsessed I am with pumpkin-flavored everything. Summer will end soon and before you know it the holidays will be here.

Back-to-school excitement will soon end but don’t let autumn fly by. Take advantage of the crisp cool weather and beautiful foliage with this list of fun things to do:

1. Make s’mores on a cool night.
2. Take fall foliage pictures and frame one/or a family photo.
3. Play in the colorful leaves, even if you crunch them in your hands.
4. Make a new fall craft project; carve a pumpkin.
5. Bake pumpkin bread or muffins – told you I was obsessed!
6. Enjoy warm apple cider outside under a cozy blanket.
7. Go apple picking.
8. Start holiday shopping early, plan ahead this year.
9. Write someone a love letter and mail it – no email (It’s fun to open mail).
10. Do whatever makes you the happiest!!

Couple walking in leaves with baby

I hope that by sharing some of my favorite fall activities you will be inspired to make the most of my favorite season!!

What is your favorite thing to do in the fall?

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Back to School: The Importance of Rest and Recovery

By: Meagan Freeman 

As a mother of 5, I have always looked forward to that special time of year when my children head back to school! It was a long, hot summer this year, and I spent my days without the usual daytime break I always need during the school year. Summer can be incredibly difficult for parents with MS, and children are often left bored at home, looking for entertainment. Temperatures often hit the 90s-100s in my area, and on those very hot days I was left a virtual prisoner, trapped at home in the A/C with children who were not often pleased. Most MS patients require a certain amount of rest during the day, and noise can become a tremendous irritant. Without a break, we often become fatigued and emotionally spent.

My children returned to school early this year, on August 24th. My oldest left for college this year, and it was surreal to help him pack up his things and head out. Though I was saddened a bit, I also thought to myself with a twinge of guilt: “Check one off the list!” The first day back was chaotic, dragging exhausted children out of bed early and forcing them to dress, eat breakfast, and get out the door begrudgingly by 7:45 AM. I have found that planning ahead and organization are the keys to success with a large family, and I always spend the evenings preparing everything needed for the morning. Lunches and snacks are packed ahead of time, clothes are in piles according to child, and backpacks are in a neat line ready to be carried out. I have issues with memory loss at times, and I find that failure to plan ahead leads to disaster. I recommend using electronic devices to plan out calendars for the week, setting “alerts” for important times and events. After forgetting to pick children up on early dismissal days several times last year, I have learned to mark out the important pick up times well in advance.

We jumped in the car on that first day of school, everyone in new outfits and excitement in the air, and made our way around town to multiple schools, into new classrooms and new adventures. After the last child left the car, I drove home slowly, sipping my coffee with a sense of great relief. I walked in the door of my home, to a quiet and peaceful spot for the first time in months. I took a deep breath, and realized that at last, I had some free time for myself.

Through these yearly experiences, I have come to understand that I need time for rest and rejuvenation. It is not a luxury for me, but rather a medical necessity. Without a chance to “recharge the batteries,” we just don’t function well as mothers and fathers with MS. Though childcare can be incredibly expensive during the summer, I would advise all parents with MS to factor in some time to rest. Those precious quiet moments are exactly what the doctor ordered, and we should all begin to see rest as a medication or a treatment, something that our disease demands. Even if a friend or family member might give you a bit of respite and take the kids for a few hours occasionally, this would be of great benefit. We should all take a bit of time to care for ourselves, so that we might care for our families in the best possible way. Happy Back to School!

*Meagan Freeman was diagnosed with RRMS in 2009, at the age of 34, in the midst of her graduate education. She is a Family Nurse Practitioner in Northern California, and is raising her 6 children (ranging from 6–17 years of age) with her husband, Wayne. She has been involved in healthcare since the age of 19, working as an Emergency Medical Technician, an Emergency Room RN, and now a Nurse Practitioner. Writing has always been her passion, and she is now able to spend more time blogging and raising MS awareness. She guest blogs for Race to Erase MS, Modern Day MS, and now MSAA. Please visit her at: http://www.motherhoodandmultiplesclerosis.com.

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Lessons from “Back to School”

For many families, September means back to school. Maybe you sent your child off for a first day of school (elementary, middle or high school each are a special moment), or maybe you are headed off to a class yourself as a college student, graduate student, teacher or professor. If none of these apply to you, then you at least see the back to school supplies and sales popping up everywhere as people make this transition.

If you are not a student or teacher, then once you leave school it can be easy to forget what a time of optimism and hope abounds at the beginning of the new school year. The hope to make new friends, achieve new academic goals, make the team, etc. is probably on the mind of all of those youngsters. Adult students may be invigorated by the goal of obtaining a successful career or the relief of having only one more year to go to finish toward a hard earned degree.

If you are not swept up in the “new year, new you” madness, take a moment. Remember that it doesn’t take classes to help you set goals or achieve outcomes. You don’t have to be in school to make new friends or have a plan of action. Sometimes, a spark of hope and optimism can help you to dream that big dream before your “first day,” and the hard work throughout the year is what helps you achieve your outcome.

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September 2014 Artist of the Month: Celebrating the Work of Artists Affected by Multiple Sclerosis

MSAA is very proud to present our 2014 Art Showcase – celebrating the work of artists affected by MS.

We have received many wonderful submissions from across the country and are delighted to share their work and their stories with you. Please visit our online gallery to view all of the new submissions.

September Artist of the Month:
Laura Patchen – Pittsford, NY

 Laura Patchen - Alma Mater

About the Artist:

“I was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in November of 1998. At the time, my daughters were just 8, 10 and 13, and I had a flourishing career as a speech-language pathologist in private practice. I feared that my life would change, and it has, but not quite in the ways I thought it would. I had to stop working in 2005, due to physical and cognitive limitations. It was difficult to give up something I loved to do, but eventually, I’ve found other things, including painting.

The “Alma Mater” is the building my speech classes were held in….a wink to the past, and a fond memory. Life goes on, MS causes changes, but being able to document important memories in acrylics helps me cope.”
Read more

Be inspired – please send an online card featuring artwork by MS artist Laura Patchen and spread awareness of MS and MSAA.

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Fall is Upon Us!

As the calendar reminds us to say goodbye to the summer season and hello to the beginning of fall, it’s a good time to start thinking about what the change of season means to you. Some people see the season change as something to embrace; to take advantage of being outdoors to enjoy the cooler temperatures, or to prepare for upcoming fall festivities and holidays that approach just as quickly as the seasons change. Do you enjoy the cool, leaf laden fall atmosphere? What about the shift from longer days to longer nights?

Children heading back to school and stores stocking up on holiday decorations are just some of the hallmarks that depict the fall season. The sound of leaves crunching under feet; the orange, red and yellow colors that paint the streets and the sight of birds making their way south for the upcoming winter months are some of the scenes that represent this fall solstice. What do you like most about the fall?

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