New Year, New Beginning

As it turned midnight on January 1st of 2018, I think a lot of people, including myself, held hopes that this new year would bring with it more optimism and hope, especially more so than its previous 2017 counterpart which brought controversy and devastation throughout the year. Entering a new year can mean new beginnings for things and more possibilities, but most importantly, a chance to reassess what your needs are and how to fulfill them. For some this may be physical needs as it relates to the body and addressing medical issues or concerns. For others this may mean focusing on emotional or spiritual needs and how this influences day to day and self-care. No matter what the needs look like, the beginning of a new year represents another fresh start to prioritize things and to take care of you.

It’s not always easy to do this with the chaos each day can bring, but that’s why you prioritize, so certain things take precedence over others when there’s not enough time in the day for everything. It may come down to making to-do lists with tasks and goals and crossing things off one by one, or setting one specific need as a goal to focus on for the week or entire month. The method of prioritizing needs doesn’t have to be perfect and it surely won’t look the same for everyone; it’s going to be tailored to each person and what their specific needs are. But it all begins with an act of self-respect; to increase awareness of what it is that’s needed and telling yourself you deserve it.

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Cognitive Changes

This month we’ve been talking about MS symptoms that aren’t spoken about or mentioned as often as other symptoms within the MS community. Some of the symptoms highlighted so far have been issues with incontinence and bowel and bladder challenges. On the My MSAA Community peer-to-peer forum, we recently asked a poll question about which commonly overlooked MS symptoms individuals would like to learn more about, and one of the results has been cognition. Though many individuals are experiencing this issue, it’s still not one discussed very often, and it’s hard not to wonder why.

With the multitude of research that has been – and continues to be – done on MS, issues with cognition are still questioned and sometimes aren’t even associated with the disease itself. Individuals often ask if MS can affect their cognition and thinking when they notice certain changes, and the answer is unfortunately yes – this, too, is another area that MS can influence. If parts of the brain that control judgement, memory, thinking, and reason are affected by MS disease activity and inflammation, then symptoms can manifest and cognitive changes can occur. Sometimes individuals do not know that cognitive changes can be a symptom of MS and they ask if there is something else going on, or is it due to getting older/the aging process itself, or stress, etc. Bringing this and other types of symptoms that aren’t discussed as frequently to the forefront will help increase awareness of them being related to MS, and in turn, start conversations on how to address them.

There are several types of feelings that can be provoked by cognition changes due to MS, and embarrassment is a feeling that oftentimes accompanies this symptom. Individuals can feel self-conscious and uncomfortable if they’re experiencing issues with their memory and thinking—especially when interacting with others or trying to fulfill work or relationship roles. Shame and guilt can be other feelings associated with cognitive difficulties too. People feel they should still be able to do certain things and not have to ask for help or admit they can’t do what they once did. It’s very common for these types of feelings to emerge when it comes to such an impactful symptom that can effect day to day situations so easily. But knowing that you don’t have to feel ashamed or guilty if it does occur is key – and so is knowing that you can talk about it with others who are supportive and can identify with you, as you are not alone in this symptom issue.

MS sets out to be a thief not only of physical body functions, but also of mind operation as well, and it’s to no fault of those affected. It’s important to recognize if you are experiencing cognitive changes or challenges, and to bring it to a healthcare professional’s attention so you can work together to try and address it. MS may have its own agenda, but you can show your power with proactive steps in symptom management and self-care and awareness.

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June 2017 Artist of the Month: Celebrating the Work of Artists Affected by Multiple Sclerosis

MSAA is very proud to present our 2017-18 Art Showcase – celebrating the work of artists affected by multiple sclerosis (MS).

We have received many wonderful submissions from across the country and are delighted to share their work and their stories with you. Please visit our online gallery to view all of the new submissions.

Susan Russo – Pearland, TX
Love Unconditional
Susan Russo - Love Unconditional

About the Artist:
“I was diagnosed with RRMS in 2001. This disease has changed my life in an amazing way. Funny how diseases tend to do just that. You either give up or battle on. I choose to battle on.

I’m not perfect. I have rough days. I cry. I get angry. But then, I pick up a paint brush and I start to create whatever I am feeling. I get lost in a beautiful world of lines and shades and colors. The creation of something visually beautiful helps me to refocus on the fact that I am so much more than my MS.”
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May 2017 Artist of the Month: Celebrating the Work of Artists Affected by Multiple Sclerosis

MSAA is very proud to present our 2017-18 Art Showcase – celebrating the work of artists affected by multiple sclerosis (MS).

We have received many wonderful submissions from across the country and are delighted to share their work and their stories with you. Please visit our online gallery to view all of the new submissions.

Martha Sue Meek – Arlington, TX
Grandmother’s Flowers
Martha Sue Meek - Grandmother's Flowers

About the Artist:
“I don’t remember a time when I didn’t love art! When mother was painting she would set me up at a place nearby. I taught art for thirty plus years.

Then MS came in with not much warning about three years ago. I have been active my whole life and then BAM, MS has slowed me down. What has happened for me is my MS, even though I didn’t ask for it, gave me time to reflect and paint! I realized my art would give me time finally to paint more than I ever had before. Art gives me great comfort and peace. MS is a battle, but I WILL NOT let it dictate how I feel about life!”
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Wellness: It’s More Than Just Physical

This month on the MS Conversations blog we’ll be talking about different aspects of wellness and its importance and impact on various parts of one’s life. With it being MS Awareness Month, it’s good to be aware of and shine light on your own well-being and state of wellness, because this can encapsulate many diverse pieces. One aspect of wellness I wanted to discuss is occupational wellness. Now usually when we hear the term ‘wellness’ we think of our bodies and the physical side of this concept, and while this is a significant part, it’s not the only piece of the puzzle.

In talking about occupational wellness I realize that everyone’s situation is unique and the workforce may or may not be a current part of one’s day to day. This is not to say that the elements of occupational wellness can’t be relevant and applied to different situations or encounters experienced by all. Some of the factors related to this piece of wellness are important to consider for any facet of life, again because it circles back to your overall state of wellness. Some basic principles of occupational wellness include satisfaction, motivation, leisure, balance, inspiration and accomplishment. No matter if you’re currently a part of the workforce or engaged in other types of activities and routines, these components are an integral part of daily life to try to acquire to help achieve wellness.

Within the workforce it’s important to try to find work that you enjoy doing—that you’re passionate about and that keeps you interested and continuously learning. Being able to work well independently and with colleagues, and communicate often are essential pieces to this, in addition to being inspired by the work you do and wanting to constantly challenge yourself in it. Sometimes it’s easier said than done, but if you find something, whether it be in work, or another kind of activity or endeavor, make sure it’s something that means something to you. When you engage in a pursuit that has purpose for you and that you can get behind, that makes all the difference.

So again, occupational wellness is just one piece of the puzzle, but it has multiple factors that are easily transferable to other aspects of life and overall well-being. Whatever it is you do – stay engaged, focused, and most of all, inspired.

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July 2016 Artist of the Month: Celebrating the Work of Artists Affected by Multiple Sclerosis

MSAA is very proud to present our 2016-17 Art Showcase – celebrating the work of artists affected by MS.

We have received many wonderful submissions from across the country and are delighted to share their work and their stories with you. Please visit our online gallery to view all of the new submissions.

July Artist of the Month:
Karen Schatz – Atlanta, GA
Shark
Karen Schatz - Shark

About the Artist:
“My first love was art but I gave it up and went to work in legal IT to support my family. After years of horrendous hours I wrote off a lot of my weird symptoms to working such long hours. I went to numerous doctors but wasn’t diagnosed until last year.

Art has helped me find myself again. I can’t always hold the brushes, but when I can paint I always feel more like me.”
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May 2016 Artist of the Month: Celebrating the Work of Artists Affected by Multiple Sclerosis

MSAA is very proud to present our 2016-17 Art Showcase – celebrating the work of artists affected by MS.

We have received many wonderful submissions from across the country and are delighted to share their work and their stories with you. Please visit our online gallery to view all of the new submissions.

May Artist of the Month:
David Desjardins – Union, ME
Country Cottage
David Desjardins - Country Cottage

About the Artist:
“Painting has always been a rewarding way to express myself. Ironically, I find that as my disabilities increase, so does the quality of my work increase.

To me, there is no better feeling than hearing someone tell me how much they love a painting I created. It gives me a tremendous feeling of well-being and accomplishment every time I finish one.”
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Hello there, Earth!

Today individuals around the world will celebrate Earth Day, an annual event known to promote environmental awareness and energy conservation. Sometimes it’s easy to take advantage of our planet and all the wonderfulness it has to offer. This is to no fault of our own—life gets busy and chaotic, and our day to day routines get in the way of appreciating the world around us. But if we consciously make the decision to stop just for a moment to take a look around at the beauty of the Earth, it will no doubt create a moment where being present and mindful of our surroundings will ignite this newfound appreciation and gratitude for the world in which we live. And there are some things we can do every day to try and preserve the splendor of the planet and its nature.

Earth-Day-2016-Poster-Earth-Day-Network

  • Recycle, recycle, and recycle!
  • Conserve energy by turning off lights and running water when not in use
  • Opt for using another mode of transportation instead of driving if able
  • Plant or garden to bring more life to the Earth
  • Raise awareness in your community for environmental protection causes

 

So this Earth Day, take a moment to join a movement, a cause, a venture to help care for our planet and all its beauty and glory. Our Earth is precious and allows us to do so much; shouldn’t we help take care of it in return?

 

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April 2016 Artist of the Month: Celebrating the Work of Artists Affected by Multiple Sclerosis

MSAA is very proud to present our 2016-17 Art Showcase – celebrating the work of artists affected by MS.

We have received many wonderful submissions from across the country and are delighted to share their work and their stories with you. Please visit our online gallery to view all of the new submissions.

April Artist of the Month:
Debra Robert – Lake Worth, FL
Constellation des Colores
Debra Robert - Constellation des Colores

About the Artist:
“I have been painting for over 25 years. I have a BA in theatre arts and an MFA in film producing. My career has taken me around the world, working in live events/concerts/conferences for over 20 years.

Now diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis (MS), I had to retire from my exciting, vibrant career. I am determined to put my energy into art full-time, surrounding myself in a world of color and light. I pull my inspiration from years of the lighting design, sounds and imaginative shapes from live performance production.”
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March 2016 Artist of the Month: Celebrating the Work of Artists Affected by Multiple Sclerosis

All-New Artists for MSAA’s 2016-2017 Art Showcase!

As part of MS Awareness Month, MSAA is very proud to present our 2016-2017 Art Showcase, celebrating the work of artists affected by MS.

We have received many wonderful submissions from across the country and are delighted to share their work and their stories with you.

Please visit our online gallery to view all of the new submissions:

MSAA's 2016 Art Showcase MSAA's 2016 Four Seasons Art Showcase

As in the past, we will highlight one Artist of the Month throughout this year and share their artwork and their story.

Presenting MSAA’s Artist of the Month for March

MSAA is very excited to present the first Artist of the Month for our 2016 Art Showcase:

March Artist of the Month:
Ginny Townsend – Montgomery, AL
Field of Flowers
Field of Flowers by Ginny Townsend

About the Artist:
“Before I was a wife, mother, grandmother; before I had MS, I was ME! It took a decade for a diagnosis! What a relief to finally know!

In between exacerbations, I ignored “MS”. Maybe it would ignore me! Then 9-11 happened. On 9-12, I had a major exacerbation. I became permanently disabled. At first I was in a wheelchair. Now I use a cane and walker. I was bored so I began painting on mayonnaise jars! I also paint on canvas.”
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Heard about our 2016 Improving Lives Benefit and Online Auction yet?

Benefit_SliderOur Online Auction is Now Open!
Event attendance is not required for this special opportunity. Click the Online Auction link below to view the packages and register for bidding. More packages available soon.

Please note: online auction will close on Wednesday March 30, 2016 at 9:00 PM EST.

Live! Online Auction

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