Parts of Life That Look Different After MS

Physical weakness, fatigue, impaired ability to remember information. MS certainly can take a toll on what day-to-day life looks like. For many living with MS, you now have a greater appreciation for what life looked like before the diagnosis.

Because it’s very common to miss aspects of life that fell victim to the disease, we wanted to start a conversation about the topic. On the MultipleSclerosis.net Facebook page, we asked you to share what you miss most.

Here’s what you had to say. Continue reading

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To be organized or not to be?

By Lauren Kovacs

This is the question.

I used to be super organized. Years ago an older MSer told me that I will learn to conserve energy in my own way. She was right. Being organized can cause energy conservation.

With three sons and a husband, organizing consists of piles. They usually have no idea where something is. When they ask me I say Continue reading

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Cut the Deck and Deal the Cards

By Lauren Kovacs

This is a big ticket for those with MS.

We never know what our hand will be. Even frequent shuffling can deal you a bad hand.

Our crystal ball has been smashed.  For me thankfully, I had 18 years of a mild MS course. I was able to work, get married, have kids and mostly be like everyone else.

I had been a college athlete and I never thought that being physically active would end.  As an adult, I took figure skating, did Irish dancing and clogged.  I was always up for something to excel at.

The changes associated with declining mobility are extremely hard.  New ways of doing things became an essential skill.  Sometimes, there is no way to really deal with the physical betrayal.  When it comes to medical equipment, picking fun colors seems to make necessary medical equipment less medical.

Changes can come frequently. Cards are often shuffled and dealt quickly.  First, I started needing a cane.  No big deal.  I bought a blue fish cover for it.  A year later, the walker came into the game.  I made sure to get one in pink with big wheels and a cool frog bag attached.  Then, another hand was dealt.  I needed a wheelchair. Not cool.  I was not happy.

I again figured a purple one would be fun.  Going with devices as non-medical as possible was a good way to deal with that change.  I made them extensions of me.  A little pinch of personality and a little bling can go a long way.  I didn’t fold and stayed in the game.

Last year we took a trip and I needed to bring a walker to use in the cabin.  We flew, so I bought a gray one that folded into a garment bag.  I used duct tape with butterflies to make it fun.

I really hated the idea of using that walker, but people saw the butterfly duct tape.  I was able to enjoy our trip a bit little more.  It was still hard to get around, but I felt less disabled.

Making change fun is the only way I can deal with mobility changes.  A pink walker, a purple wheelchair or butterfly duct tapes were simple changes that were not medical.  Make changes as non-medical as possible, when it comes to mobility equipment.  I was dealt a bad hand, but injecting fun is a simple way to make a bad hand livable.

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Dental Hygiene and Multiple Sclerosis

dental

Dental issues can create a problem for anyone, but especially for individuals with MS.  Gum disease, abscesses, and decay can all lead to infections, which may cause MS symptoms to increase.  Often in the management of other health-related issues, dental issues are overlooked.  In coordinating MS doctors’ appointments and follow up’s, it is often a challenge to coordinate dental care as well.

Overall dental health is important for many reasons.  It promotes healthy eating and digestion, allowing our bodies to absorb the right amount of nutrients.  It is also an important factor in enhancing the enjoyment of food and being social.

Individuals with significant fatigue and/or mobility impairment may find office visits beyond those required for their MS care to be particularly difficult to manage. It may be helpful to inform the doctor or office staff of any difficulties you may have with fatigue or mobility.  For many, sitting in the dental chair for an hour can be quite uncomfortable due to these symptoms. Talk with the office staff about ways that this can be managed.  Perhaps, many of the initial “question and answer” type things can be performed while sitting or standing in a more comfortable position.

If the symptoms of MS are impacting the ability to brush and floss, speak with your doctor about other tools or adaptive devices that may be helpful.  If the grip on your toothbrush is too small, perhaps wrapping something around the base such as tape or an ace-bandage may assist with making the grip better.  You may also cut a tennis ball and place the toothbrush through the ball for a larger grip, or fasten a bicycle-type handle to the base.

Although it is recommended to brush and floss, don’t forget about the power of mouth wash.  Many washes offer an antiseptic quality that assists with fighting gum disease.  With gum and infections causing many dental issues, mouth wash may be an appropriate additive to your brushing routine to help try to prevent infections and inflammation.

With the changes in the Affordable Care Act and individuals now receiving greater access to medical care, it may be helpful to contact your insurer to learn about your dental benefits.  For those without coverage or without insurance, there are still many ways to be seen by a dentist.

Check out the following tips on how to find dental care for the uninsured:

  • Check for a local federally qualified health clinic which offers dental services
  • Look into local dental schools. Most of these teaching facilities have clinics that allow dental students to gain experience treating patients while providing care at a reduced cost. Experienced, licensed dentists closely supervise the students
  • Dental Lifelines Network offers information about free dental services in the area for those that qualify.  You can look up information about your state’s program on the program’s website: http://dentallifeline.org/
  • Dial 2-1-1 and connect with your local United Way. You may be directed to free or reduced cost dental services
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